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Royal Geographical Society (with IBG): the heart of geography
Animating public space
Field studies
Foresight report: Future of food and farming
Irish out-migration
Politically correct
South Downs showdown
Teenage time bomb
Who do we think we are?

Changing places

Locality | shaping places | demography | culture and cultural difference | food production and circulation | rebranding and marketing | identity | experiences | economic restructure | connections | consumption | lived experience | belonging | external forces on place | socio-economic change


A Level subject content overviews

To support teachers with the introduction of the 2016 A Level courses, the Society is providing a new range of online resources and support. The following overview documents provide an introduction for teachers to some of the key content, concepts and geographical theories within the new A Levels and will be particularly useful for colleagues who have not previously taught elements of the new content. These have been written by leading academic geographers, a number of whom were members of the ALCAB subject advisory panel for geography. 

 Articles

Rosedene Raspberries & Tesco's Fictitious Farms (August 2016) In the spring of 2016 Tesco launched a line of meat and fresh produce under a series of farm names which replaced their Everyday Value 'basics' range. However the produce was found to come from manufacturers with no relation to the names on the packaging of the final product.
Regeneration and exclusion in Astana, Kazakhstan (June 2015) Astana, the new capital in Kazakhstan, represents more than just a new start; it became a means of symbolising the country’s movement away from centralised Soviet control
Factors influencing the success of pastoral farming in developing countries (March 2015) More recently there has been the recognition of a complex relationship between pastoral farmers in the developing world and the size of their herds
Rural migration: Why do the British move to French idylls? (August 2013) Since the 19th century, British citizens have moved to rural France in search of an ‘unspoilt’ and ‘rustic’ way of life
The horsemeat scandal and other food geographies (March 2013) The recent revelation about horsemeat unknowingly making its way onto British plates has raised questions about where our food comes from
Animating public space: A case study in soft regeneration (November 2012) Urban public spaces are at their best when they are democratic, inclusive, and meet the needs of a wide range of people
Fast Food Geography (November 2012) How McDonald’s has learned to embrace globalisation and glocalisation 
Foresight report: Future of food and farming (November 2012) Looking at the challenges expected in the area of food and farming over the next 40 years
London Docklands +30 (October 2012) In 2012, Docklands finally overtook the City district to become the highest-ranked employment zone for financial services in London
Follow the thing: Papaya (October 2012) Papaya: an exotic fruit. Grown in Jamaica. Eaten in the UK. However, all is not as it seems. How did that papaya come to your dinner table?
Surf's up! (September 2012) Cornwall is experiencing a technological revolution with broadband speeds in many areas among the fastest in the UK
Olympic impacts (September 2012) Geography Professor Allan Brimicombe from the University of East London is leading an impact study on behalf of the London Organising Committee of LOCOG and the IOC
Threatened heritage landscapes (July 2012) Investigating how a range of 21st Century pressures can threaten the conservation of Britain’s historic urban and rural landscapes
Net migration news (June 2012) How are migration trends affecting UK population growth and how has the government responded?
Two speed Britain (May 2012) Is the "north-south" divide intensifying and are local scale inequalities increasing?

Global production networks (May 2011)

Investigating the interconnections & ethics of global manufacturing

Irish out-migration (March 2011)

The rise of the Irish diaspora
Teenage time bomb (January 2011) Why do newspapers portray Britain’s teenagers as an endangered species?
Digital divide in Britain (December 2009) The rapid growth of the internet over the last 20 years is dramatically changing the way we live, work and consume
Fast Food Farmers (September 2009) Investigating the aspect of the ethics of global trade – the treatment of agricultural workers at the other end of our food supply chain
Britain's ageing population (June 2009) With widespread fall in fertility rates and significant rises in life expectancy, the median age of Britain’s population is rising
The hidden cost of what we consume (June 2009) Water is an essential resource, but the scale of global water consumption needed to produce what we use and consume has a dramatic impact around the world
South Downs show down (March 2009) A look at the new National Park designation
The politics of design: architecture, tall buildings and the skyline of central London (March 2009) After 2000 a handful of very tall buildings were approved in central London, a circumstance that challenged well-established planning practices
The great global grape migration (February 2009) What will be the effects of climate change on the world's wine regions?
UK migration controversies: A simple guide (February 2009) This policy briefing sets out the current state of geographics research evidence on migration and its impacts on UK economy and society
Issues of migration (January 2009) Issues of migration are currently high on the political and public agenda in the UK and other developed countries across the world
The four corners of the food crisis (July 2008) Population growth,rising affluence,energy policy and climate change – these are the “four corners” of the food crisis
Who do we think we are? (April 2008) Why is everyone talking about Census data, family history and national identity?
Going Global MTV Networks (April 2008) The global consumption of music
Field studies (November 2007) Where are the major festivals located and what are the impacts they create?
Bigging it up (July 2007) The changing shape of London. How and why is the city expanding?
Global goals? (June 2006) Are you eating, sleeping, drinking and teaching the World Cup? How does our consumption of the global game impact us and others around the world?
Family fortunes (April 2006) Why are French mothers being offered cash for babies? Why is Europe worried about population size?
Politically correct? (December 2005) Does the UK political map correctly represent you? What does politics have to do with geography and what does geography have to do with politics?
Past papers (March 2005) How can online use of the 1861 and 2001 Census help GCSE geography students?
Small wonder (March 2005) As the UK steel industry struggles, Mini moves up a gear - why are these two stories of manufacturing so different? And why hasn’t the Mini been driven overseas?
Tropical taste (November 2004) What does a taste for tropical water tell us about global networks of production and consumption?
Rainbow Nation (May 2004) 10 years on from Apartheid: How is South Africa really?
Last orders (April 2004) Why is Guinness leaving London?
Bachelor boys (March 2004) What are the hidden costs of China’s one-child policy?
What killed King Coal? (March 2004) 20 years on: what were the causes and consequences of the 1984 miners’ strike?
Fat north, thin south (March 2004) Does the UK show a north-south ‘obesity divide’?
GM foods: the debate (October 2003) What are the issues surrounding GM food production?
Grain of truth or GM fudge? (October 2003) Will results of the latest study mean the go ahead for GM crops in the UK?
Gaelic tongue on the menu (Octover 2003) How will the new Gaelic Bill help the Highlands?
Studentification (September 2003) Are university students displacing working and middle class households?
Charging scheme really cuts the jam (June 2003) Three months on and is London's congestion charge a success?
What can stop the urban rot? (May 2003) Investment in deprived urban areas may not be tackling the roots of their decline
Brown Future for Greenfields? (February 2003) Greenfield areas are again under pressure from urban sprawl
Cash to help Farmers out of trough (February 2003) New government scheme aims to help farmers recover from foot-and-mouth
Congestion Charging Ahead (February 2003) London's controversial congestion charge examined from a geographer's perspective


 Online lectures

Made in Britain (March 2015) How can the UK adapt to the challenges and build on our proud manufacturing history to capitalise on opportunities and ensure we remain a manufacturing powerhouse?

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Where do we stand on the world? Professor Jerry Brotton (February 2014) Why is the north at the top of most maps? In a talk ranging from classical world maps to contemporary digital ones, Jerry explores the subjective and political beliefs that have mapped the world

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Escape to the city (June 2014) Around 75% of the world’s population will live in cities by 2050. What impact is urban living having on our wellbeing? What can we learn from cities around the world? And how can we balance rapid urbanisation with quality of life?

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London versus the rest (March 2014) One of the world's great cities is in Britain but it doesn’t always feel an advantage for non-Londoners. Why is London so dominant in Britain and what should the rest of the country do in response?

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The landgrabbers, Fred Pearce (March 2014) Land is suddenly a scarce resource. African plains, Asian paddy fields and South American jungles are being snapped up. Who are the grabbers, and who the victims?

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Mobile middle class (March 2014) The global class system is changing. By 2030, two billion people will join the middle class from emerging economies, leaving Europe and North America with less than a third of the total middle class population. What impact is this having on people and the planet?

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Big data, big impact? (November 2013) We are living in a data explosion where we generate and consume data faster than we can keep track of and secure. This volume of new data presents us with additional challenges: what are we going to do with it? How are we unlocking its potential? And how are we making it work for society?

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Feeding the 9 billion (October 2013) Our global food system is under increasing strain. We need to produce and supply enough safe and nutritious food in a sustainable way to a population which is expected to rise to 9 billion by 2050. How are we meeting this challenge with new technology as well as new thinking?

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The green road across England, Hugh Thomson (September 2013) Hugh Thomson traces the evocative 400 mile Icknield Way from Dorset to Norfolk, passing Maiden Castle, Stonehenge and Avebury to reach his destination in Seahenge

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Countryside in crisis? (June 2013) Environmental risks and hazards like bovine TB, ash dieback and neonicotinoid pesticides are affecting our biodiversity and agriculture. Is Government getting its policies right and striking a balance between maximising innovation and minimising harm?

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A South Indian journey, Michael Wood (May 2013) A long time traveller in Tamil Nadu, broadcaster and historian Michael Wood reflects on what has been called the last surviving classical civilisation and on the relationships between geography, climate and culture

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Measured, recorded and then what?, Paul Boyle (March 2013) The Government collects data about us all but are we gaining the best use from it? Paul Boyle, ESRC Chief Executive, uses fascinating examples to argue that the UK could lead the world in using routinely collected data to give new research insights into the UKs changing society

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Travels in New Colombia, Tom Feiling (February 2013)

In 2011, Tom Feiling spent nine very peaceful months travelling around the Colombian countryside. In this lecture, he reflects on violence, bio-diversity and Colombia's future as a rising star of the global economy and tourist destination

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Brazil, Michael Palin (December 2012) In an illustrated talk, Michael covers the making of his BBC television series Brazil, which took him to every part of this fascinating country, from Roraima in the north to the Iguacu Falls in the south.

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Hugging the coast, Johanna Wadsley and Duika Burges Watson (November 2012) Neville Shulman Challenge Award recipients Johanna and Duika talk about their exploration by sea-kayak of the remote Sangihe Archipelego in Indonesia and of the interconnections between the lives of local seaweed farmers and global issues

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Walking London's Lost Rivers, Tom Bolton (November 2012) Tom talks about London's lost rivers, showing how to search out vanished rivers through streetscape of modern London and discovering how they came to disappear. The talk peels back the city's layers of history

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Agriculture for change, Professor Sir Gordon Conway (October 2012) Gordon investigates the question 'with one billion hungry people can we feed the world?'. From the science of agricultural advances to the politics of food security, he outlines a sustainable and achievable development pathway towards ending endemic hunger

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Five centuries of mapping India, Manosi Lahiri (October 2012) The first modern maps of coastal India were made by European sailors and merchants. Britain mapped the interior while expanding its colony and later, to administer it. Independent India encouraged mapping for defense. Manosi explores the history of mapping this vast country.

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Keeping pace with the digital revolution (May 2012) The internet is rapidly evolving to play a central role in society, transforming social, cultural, economic and political landscapes. The benefits are clear, but are societies equipped to keep pace with the consequences of our increasing reliance on this technology?

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Adapting to an urban future (December 2011) Humans are rapidly becoming an urban species.
Global population has passed 7 billion, 3.5 billion people are urbanised and over 1 billion people now live in slums.
How will urban centres keep pace with predicted continuing growth? What are the visions of tomorrow’s cities?

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Educating for tomorrow (2011) Living in an increasingly globalised society offers both opportunities and challenges. How can education best prepare young Britons to fulfil their potential in a rapidly changing world?

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Persistent poverty in Britain (March 2011) Britain is the world’s fifth richest country, yet poverty in Britain is rising. With paid work failing to reduce poverty for many, how can Britain best tackle this growing issue?

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Can the UK ever be sustainable? (December 2010) Our way of life is placing an increasing burden on the planet, but how realistic are visions of a sustainable future? How can business, politics and the creative industries help create a sustainable future?

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Not in my back yard (March 2010) With pressure on the UK’s ageing energy and transport infrastructures mounting, is it time to put projects of national importance ahead of local concerns? Or does this bypass our democratic right to object?

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Digital divide in the UK (December 2009) Does the internet's rapid evolution and increasing role in daily life threaten to leave some sections of society behind?

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Britain's ageing population (June 2009) As the baby boom generation approach retirement, Britain's population is ageing. Discover the changing nature of retirement; the importance of older people in the workforce; the increasing pressures on public services and how Britain is adapting to an ageing society.

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The future shape of capitalism (March 2009) Will the recent financial crisis and the downturn in the global economy change the shape of capitalism as we know it today?

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Migration: Skills and the job market (November 2008) Too often controversy surrounding UK migration and what impacts migrants have on our economy and society is based on myth, fear and falsehood. Explore some of the issues and misconceptions around changing European workforce patterns in the 21st Century.

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Concreting the countryside (May 2008) How should we accommodate the housing expansion in London and SE England? Should we be building on greenfield or brownfield land?

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Resources

KS2: Brazil A look at both the human and physical characteristics of Brazil
KS2: The Mediterranean A look at Europe and the Mediterranean Sea, including a focus on Italy
KS2: Exploring Shackleton’s Antarctica A look at the 1915 Endurance expedition and daily life in Antarctica
KS3: You are what you eat Investigating interdependence in our food supply chain
KS3: Our place in history Investigating the local area
KS3: Changing faces, shaping places Exploring migration
KS3: Mapping London Looking at London mapping, past, present and future
KS3: Encounters - Images of Empire Who were the explorers who explored the world in the nineteenth century?
KS3: Journeys - Caribbean stories Explore what the Caribbean was like in the early 20th century
KS4: Seaweed farming An exploration by sea kayak of liminal (marginal) living and rural development in North Sulawesi, Indonesia, focusing on seaweed farming


Case studies

Evaluating Hydroponic Farming in Japan (July 2015) Hydroponic farming grows food crops without the use of soil and natural light, instead replacing these conditions with liquid nutrient feed and light emitting diodes (LEDs) in indoor farms 
Bicester: New Garden City (January 2015) It has been announced that the small market town of Bicester is to be the next new garden city


Ask the Experts

British migration to rural France (August 2013) Dr Michaela Benson, Lecturer of Sociology, University of York
Overfishing (December 2012) Liam Carr, US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)
Public space (November 2012) Regan Koch, PhD Student, University College London
Food globalisation (October 2012) Ian Cook , Associate Professor of Geography, University of Exeter
Identity and citizenship (January 2010) Dr Mary Gilmartin,  Lecturer in Human Geography, National University of Maynooth, Ireland
Sustainable agriculture (August 2007) Gordon Conway, Chief Scientific Adviser to the Department for International Development


60 second guides

  • Sub Saharan Africa
  • Would you like flies with that?
  • Food prices
  • UK migration
  • Poverty in Britain
  • Britain's ageing population
  • Economic growth
  • Guide to housing crisis
  • Changing class systems 

    School Members, Early Career Teacher Members and Young Geographers can sign in to read the full range of articles. If you are not already a member you can join us as a School Member or Young Geographer and access our vast library of educational articles.
     

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