Be Inspired: Shackleton’s ghost writer: are authorship standards always important? - Art Gertel

Using the historical drama of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s Endurance voyage and subsequent publications, Art Gertel will juxtapose authorship criteria between popular and scientific/medical literature.

Sarah examines power, politics and offshore renminbi market making in London.

Emma is the first person to run across Africa from Henties Bay, Namibia to Pemba, Mozambique. In this talk, she shares the lessons learned on this and other adventures.

Professor Joanna Haigh will outline the scientific evidence for a human influence on climate and discuss pathways to limit the rate of global warming and its disastrous impacts.

Back in 1890, trailblazer Nellie Bly circled the globe faster than anyone ever had - in 72 days. 125 years later, Rosemary followed in her global footsteps and has now written Nellie's biography.

Hear from Quintin Lake about his photographic project The Perimeter, and see some of the amazing images that he captured around the coast of Britain on a journey where "each footstep leads to different surprises, beauty and strangeness".

Archives and collections assembled as part of colonial projects are troubling presences in our cultural and scientific institutions. 

The state of nature – and why should we even care? - Dr Mark Wright

In this Covid-19 world there has been a renewed interest in looking at our relationship with nature. This talk will explore what is the real state of nature and what underpins the significant changes we are seeing.

Explore beneath the muddy waters of Mozambique to discover the forces that cause floods, and see how global flood forecasting is helping people cheat fate and choose their own destiny.

Be Inspired: Always ready for an expedition - Natalie Cox

This talk recounts the extraordinary life of explorer Richard Burton whilst embracing the wider history of 19th century science.

In this talk, Michael Poland will discuss some of this science, as well as the hits and misses of science communication efforts regarding Yellowstone's volcanic character.

Photographer Kiliii Yüyan illuminates stories of the Arctic and human communities connected to the land. Informed by ancestry that is both Nanai/Hèzhé (East Asian Indigenous) and Chinese-American, he explores the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives.

Canoeing through Covid: citizen science on the Severn

As the lockdown lifts, Alex McDermott and friends re-plan with a new aim: to explore Covid’s impact on a river, its people, and the wider environment.

Chernobyl: time travel to 1986

Yulia Savchuk returns to her native Ukraine, chasing childhood memories and examining what the Soviet era could teach us about living with ‘invisible killers’.

Our flat Earth: adventures of a digital detective

Starting from sepia photos in an album, Emma de Heveningham unpicks the mystery of her grandfather’s time in South America, tracing his footsteps across a screen with her fingertips.

Pushing the limits: life and death at the sharp end

Having traversed Antarctica by ski, Dr Alex Brazier is no stranger to working in a team under pressure. Now, his work in a busy ICU through a pandemic brings new insights into stamina and resilience.

Voices of the Maya: discovery and language in Belize

Charlotte Austwick takes us to a jungle village, where she helps the community secure cultural survival through the creation of Q’eqchi’ and Mopan Maya illustrated reading books.

There’s more to a Dragon than meets the eye: the Wales Coast Path

Along 870 miles of Welsh shores, Zoe Langley-Wathen reshapes her view of the country, and despite the moods of the Dragon, becomes the first woman to walk the route.

To weigh the Earth: lessons from east Greenland

Richard Phillips leads a month-long traverse across tough ground, a journey of exploration and science that leads his students to reinterpret their sense of place.

Back in the saddle: cycling the Iron Curtain

After a spine injury ends her prospects of a sports career, Laura Scott packs up her life and cycles 5500 miles from the Arctic Circle to the Black Sea. Solo.

Project UKFall: Retrieving meteorites and why it's important - Dr Luke Daly

This talk will give you an opportunity to discover how projects like UKFall are tracking fireballs to recover meteorites, providing new insights into our solar system's history.

Paul Clements delves into the Shannon heartland on a foot-stepping quest to recreate the trip of Richard Hayward 80 years earlier.

There are over 250 lost or ruined churches and religious building remains in Norfolk. Illustrating these with his sublime photographs, Clive gives us a tour of these wonderful structures.

Sue Watt takes us on a journey across the continent’s sub Saharan regions to show how vital sustainable tourism can be for the people and wildlife of these countries.

Our panel will take you around the globe to witness some of the most extreme natural hazards.

A panel featuring contributors to the Geography Directions blog discussing latest geographical research on the economic impacts of COVID-19, with a particular focus on food supply.

Hear Chris explain the meaning behind mask rituals and why humans have worn masks since the dawn of civilization.

Be Inspired: Genealogy, geography and archives - Chandan Mahal

This talk recounts how people of Punjabi descent worked with the Society's archive to explore the places associated with their ancestral heritage.

Earth Photo: in conversation with winning photographers

Each year the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Forestry England and Parker Harris host the Earth Photo competition, attracting contributions from around the world. This event brings together winning photographers for personal presentations and a panel discussion.

This talk presents findings from the ASSIST research project. Starting from a geological perspective and issues of spatial proximity and sense place, the project also incorporates insights and methods from psychology and computer science.

Join our panel as we discuss the ethics of wildlife encounters.

Hear Hilary and Janice tell us about their visit to Socotra, with its pink rocks, chubby desert roses and dragon’s blood trees like giant mushrooms.

Communicating and understanding risk in dynamic situations

The first in a new series of fireside chats led by the Disaster Risk Management Professional Practice Group, bringing together industry experts from a range of sectors and backgrounds to explore issues facing disaster risk management.

A look at the developments in 3D visualisation of geodata and the interactions between the geospatial and simulation communities that are driving new technological developments in this area. 

Professor Larner challenges accounts of the ‘neoliberal university’ by discussing the growing recognition that research excellence takes multiple forms.

The Norfolk Broads are made up of over 150 miles of navigable waterways.

Join Bjørn Heyerdahl, the grandson of Thor, as he recounts his expedition around South Africa's Cape of Storms in a traditional wooden Viking boat with a team of world class explorers.

British explorer Bertram Thomas became the first person to cross the largest sand desert on Earth. Hear how Mark and his Omani companions retraced Thomas’s footsteps on their own 49 day journey from Salalah to Doha.

Emma will discuss her expedition journey from Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, across the Davis Strait to Resolute, Nunavut. 

From vast deserts and deep oceans to dinosaur-filled swamps, the Jurassic Coast is one of the world's greatest geological wonders.

Be Inspired: Woman with the iceberg eyes - Katherine Macinnes

From housewife to CBE and NHM collector, Woman with the Iceberg Eyes traces the fascinating story of an Edwardian lady after whom Oriana Ridge, Antarctica, is named.

Two Frogs - Andy Dickson

Andy Dickson is a triathlete with a passion for the Lake District, the UK’s most visited national park. In 2020 he set himself the challenge of tackling two iconic ultra-endurance journeys - the Frog Graham and Frog Whitton - through the mountains, valleys and lakes of this celebrated landscape, becoming the first person ever to complete both.

Discover how bears and people coexist in the Interandean dry forests of Bolivia through the themes of changing attitudes and perceptions, increasing tolerances, and finding economic alternatives to livestock.

In this talk hear leading cartographer with the British Antarctic Survey explain the development of his latest map series that unfold new stories of Antarctica.

Be Inspired: Travellers in the Great Steppe: uncovering a hidden history - Nick Fielding

In his new history of the exploration of the steppes, Nick Fielding shows that there is a hidden and far more diverse history for this vast region that is commonly known in the West.

Explore the exquisite balance of nature in the Yukon Territory, including the waxing and waning of the iconic lynx, snowshoe hare, and abalone fishers.

This lecture introduces the life of travel writer and photographer Eric Newby and the times in which he lived, following the recent donation of his archives to the Society.

To discover more of the story of its independence, Olie Hunter Smart takes on an immense challenge to walk the length of India - a 4,500km journey over seven months seeking out untold stories of India's independence and partition.

Building relationships to ensure humanitarian delivery of aid - Henry Chamberlain

Ensuring aid safely reaches the right place is a vital job. Henry will give us insight into the obstacles in supplying aid and the strategies used to overcome them.

Be Inspired: Unarticulated narratives of women on David Livingstone’s Expeditions - Kate Simpson

Kate explores the RGS-IBG’s digital library to identify the African women in the expeditions of David Livingstone.

Hear how Michael and his team overcame the difficulties to make a documentary series in one of the least visited countries in the world.

Get your snorkel gear at the ready and come on an adventure into the North Atlantic Ocean!

Learn about what we can all do to help save the sea no matter where we live.

The focus is Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova expedition which relied so heavily on the support of the Society.

Kate is passionate about outreach and engagement and is an advocate of zero-emission living - even at the poles. 

In 1874, John Forrest led an expedition on a 2,700 mile crossing of Australia’s Western Desert.

DEFRA’s Chief Scientific Adviser explains how this can be done.

we delve into this masterpiece of nature writing where Nan Shepherd describes her journeys into the Cairngorm mountains of Scotland. 

We discuss the risks to the UK of a world that’s three degrees warmer, as well as how we can adapt in response.

Revisiting rewilding - John Harold

Rewilding: it’s a popular word and it probably isn’t going away. But what does it really mean?

Kristine speaks of her personal experience working in Chile and Argentina to restore damaged ecosystems and bring back native species, and the moral imperative we all have to stand up for nature.

Talks and discussion to inspire and inform your own projects.

We explore how a brief UV-B burst, during a climatic warming interval, collapsed the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary terrestrial ecosystem.

Climate change is a geopolitical problem, impacting all countries and requiring global action.

RGS-IBG 2019 Award Recipients Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent and Redzi Bernard discuss their travels in India, Myanmar and Ethiopia.

In this audio-only event, Jacki Hill-Murphy is interviewed by Penny Tranter about her forthcoming book ‘The Life and Travels of Isabella Bird’.

Annapurna 1970

Two great firsts. The 50th anniversary Mount Everest Foundation lecture.

A look at the background to the British attempts to climb Mount Everest in the 1920s and at the expeditions of 1921, 1922 and 1924. Illustrated by archives, artefacts and photographs from the Collections of the Society.

Learn more about Antarctica’s unique geopolitical situation, current research being conducted, as well as an insight into the future of this continent.

Retail geography in Britain has changed constantly throughout history, but the triple impacts of the internet, Covid-19 and Brexit threaten unprecedented change, possibly irreversible.

At a time when independent travel seems like a distant memory, Rajesh reflects upon the glory of slow travel and how it will adapt in the future.

Join our panel of travel vloggers and videographers to learn how to create great travel videos.

Be Inspired: Gotham rising - Jules Stewart

The iconic architecture and culture that defines New York as we know it today, from the Empire State Building and Rockefeller Centre. It was Gotham's defining decade.

In this lecture Nigel challenges us to set aside our normal assumptions and take off our NHS spectacles to see the world differently and take control of our health.

Simon Leatherdale tells us why the coastal woods of the UK are under appreciated on a national level, as they represent a unique natural habitat where beach meets bough.

The more we learn about fungi, the less makes sense without them. Join us for a panel discussion on the book and the themes it raises. 

Food security and sustainability in post-conflict Freetown - Professor Tony Binns

Drawing on four decades of research in West Africa, Tony Binns explores the crucial role of urban agriculture in post-conflict Sierra Leone.

Two of our most recent medalists will discuss the progress of development in the Asian countryside and the threats to rural livelihoods in Peru post-Covid-19.

The history of the city - Ben Wilson

In this episode of Geography Now, critically acclaimed author Ben Wilson joins us to discuss the history of 'humankind's greatest invention', the city.

Estimates and instruments: the case for comparative maritime history - Dr Margaret Schotte

Margaret discusses the distinctive ways in which mariners from England, France, Spain and the Netherlands deployed instruments and determined their daily progress.

Coastal marine ecosystems are not only beautiful, but also reduce impacts from climate change, enhance coastal wildlife, fisheries and local economies.

This event combines a short film, a virtual exhibition tour and a Q&A to launch ‘Sense of Here’.

This lecture focuses on these dynamics in Cambodia, examining how classical dance has been mobilised to rebuild the Cambodian nation after the Khmer Rouge genocide (1975-1979).

In this short presentation, Jacki Hill-Murphy speaks to Penny Tranter about all things weather. 

Andy highlights the importance of geography and integration of new forms of dynamic spatial data in understanding disease spread, designing elimination strategies and planning for the next pandemic. 

A geographical exploration of Britain's mysterious past - Mary-Ann Ochota

In this episode of Geography Now, archaeologist Mary-Ann Ochota talks to us about the unearthed mysteries of the past, taking us on a geographical journey around Britain. 

Developing Slow Ways: a network of walking routes that connects Great Britain's towns and cities. How can we all contribute?

Having retraced Shackleton’s 1916 survival journey, Tim explains how South Georgia’s glacial melt over the past 100 years has confirmed the importance of Shackletonian leadership in tackling climate change.

Be Inspired: Kalli on the ship - Peter Martin

This lecture examines the circumstances surrounding the abduction of Kallihirua, a member of the Inughuit community of Northern Greenland who was visited by the crew of the Assistance during the 1850–51 Franklin Search Expedition. 

Rewilding is believed to be our hope for the future, breathing life into our landscapes and rural communities. 

In this interview, Dr Bharat Pankhania talks about the coronvairus pandemic, giving a fascinating and chilling insight into its future impact on society. 

The impact of COVID-19 on the geological cycle - Alice Fugagnoli

In this episode of Geography now, geologist Alice Fugagnoli discusses her PhD research on the effect of microplastics on the geological cycle, and how the impact of COVID-19 might be seen by future generations.

Reaching for the Poles: the South Pole - Eugene Rae

From Phipps to Fiennes: a look at some of the explorers who tried to reach the North or South Poles and some who tried to do both.

Reaching for the Poles: the North Pole - Eugene Rae

From Phipps to Fiennes: a look at some of the explorers who tried to reach the North or South Poles and some who tried to do both.

A fantastic opportunity to hear from number one best-selling author, Alice Morrison, so close to finishing her latest expedition across the Sahara.

Antipodes on the page - Eugene Rae

Antipodes on the page looks at the European encounter with Australia and New Zealand from the early navigators and first colonists through to the period of inland exploration.

Seaside pleasure piers are unique heritage assets and flagship tourism attractions at Britain’s coastal resorts, but piers are increasingly under threat. 

Soil science: exciting and needed! - Dr Jenny Jones

Soil is our vital resource yet we tend to overlook it. Most people have contact with soil daily, even if only walking over it, but will rarely consider its value.

The Taylor and Francis award, football related trafficking and race in geography - Dr James Esson

Dr James Esson talks to us about his research on the irregular migration of West African males to Europe through football related human trafficking and race issues within British geography.

200 years of Antarctica - Camilla Nichol

In this episode of Geography now, Chief Executive of the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust (UKAHT) Camilla Nichol joins us to talk about the 200th year since Antarctica was sighted, and the heritage conservation work that UKAHT are involved with. 

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Kielder.

Titan beetles and geographical fieldwork - Eleanor Drinkwater

In this episode of Geography now, entomologist Eleanor Drinkwater discusses her recent fieldwork researching Titan beetles, her love of talking about invertebrates, and how she paved her unique geographical career path.

Geographers and pandemics - Dr Janey Messina

In this episode of Geography now, Dr Janey Messina talks to us about the work that she does as a geographer in the field of health, the interdisciplinarity of geography, and how geographers can help to deal with a pandemic.

World-renowned climber and alpinist, Leo has led major expeditions and hard first ascents on every continent from El Capitan to Everest and from the Amazon to Antarctica. He has produced multiple award winning films of these expeditions taking modern action sports to the most remote corners of Earth.

Mountain pressure: Snowdonia's cultural landscape at a crossroads - John Harold

Hear Snowdonia’s various pasts and futures as a cultural landscape, as wildland, and as a people's playground.

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Fort William. Locks, lochs, glens and Bens - this virtual walk has it all.

Luke Turner talks about his book Out of the Woods, a critically acclaimed work of memoir and nature writing. 

Ocean plastics and lessons from life at sea - Emily Penn

In this episode of Geography now, ocean advocate and skipper Emily Penn joins us to discuss her recent expedition to raise awareness of the ocean plastic problem, a new platform to help us find solutions, and what we can learn from living at sea.

What makes a successful rural community? How can community be developed? How can success be measured?

The Ness Award, poetry and icy exploration- Nancy Campbell

In this episode of Geography now, Nancy Campbell joins us to discuss her poetry, the geographical individuals who have inspired her work, and what it means to be the recipient of the 2020 Ness Award.

Take a virtual journey with photographer Beth Wald into the remote and harshly beautiful Wakhan Corridor of northeast Afghanistan.

British reintroductions - Peter Cooper

In this episode of Geography now podcast, Peter Cooper discusses animal reintroductions from a British perspective.

A tale of two seas - Professor Tom Rippeth

Professor Tom Rippeth explores the interconnectedness of the global oceans with our weather and climate.

Paul Rose takes us on an expedition across the world from your own home. 

Humanity’s tenure on Earth has had very far-reaching consequences. Joe charts the past, present and future of environmental ideas and actions to help find a way through these difficult times.

A guided virtual walk full of fascinating context and history, led by Dick Bateman.

We live in a world shaped by food: a ‘sitopia' (from Gk. sitos, food + topos, place), yet, as Covid-19 reminds us, our failure to recognise this threatens us and our planet. Yet by learning to value food once again, we can not only address the multiple threats we face, but can build better, fairer, more resilient lives for the future.

Paul reflects on life with over 50 neighbours over six years, where residents tackle the climate and now the current COVID-19 crises through living in an affordable, co-operative home ownership community made from straw and wood.

A hard day's light: racing the sun across Hadrian's Wall - Jamie Rutherford

Can Jamie Rutherford follow the wall and run the width of England before the sun sets?

In search of a 'lost' house in Bangladesh - Shreyashi Dasgupta

70 years after Partition, Shreyashi Dasgupta goes in search of her grandfather's old home.

Buried treasure: unearthing an archipelago's lost ecosystem - Alvaro Castilla-Beltrán

Alvaro Castilla-Beltrán takes us to Cape Verde to understand the impact of humans on biodiversity, exploring the soils beneath his feet.

Project Armenia: climbing above the clouds - Peter Rosso

On an expedition to scout new routes, Peter Rosso is challenged to address long-term mental health issues while high on the cliff walls.

Rhythm revolution: exploring Iran through its rich musical heritage - Ruairi Glasheen

Ruairi Glasheen meets the young musicians drumming new life into ancient Persian traditions.

Last stop in the remote Pacific - Liv Grant

Leading an expedition to the Marquesas Islands to study a rare parrot, Liv Grant treks uninhabited islands, swims shark-filled waters and joins a festival of feathers.

Around the world on nothing but optimism - Becca Marsh, Maximillian White and Joel Chevallier

Becca Marsh, Maximillian White and Joel Chevallier take adventures to misrepresented places, beginning with a trip around the globe in a £75 car.

Greenland and Antarctica are distant, unfamiliar places. We hear of giant icebergs breaking away, glaciers crumbling: but how much we do know about the fate of these great ice sheets?

‘The lines, which are so very fine’: John Harrison, William Hogarth and the trouble with drawing a line of Longitude. Katy considers how a clockmaker and an engraver played their parts in how the longitude problem was solved on paper, in London, before it could ever be resolved at sea.

Having successfully crewed the first British sailing boat to sail around the North East/North West passages in one season, David gives us his personal account of this exciting journey and the consequences of this venture.

Our expert panel look at food security and the potential role of new technology, as well as how we can be more mindful of seasonality, production processes, consumption and waste.

Peter explores how the strategic location of Singapore has historically made it a contested space and what role the island and its settlements have played across the centuries.

The Director of the world’s largest migration research project argues that inequality should be central to our thinking about migration and how inequality is an important analytical tool for understanding migration processes and outcomes.

Photographer Guillaume Bonn and curator Rozemin Keshvani discuss Bonn's photo essay on East Africa's disappearing past, barely recognisable but through the echoes of architectural ruins and fragile landscapes.

Isabella tells the story of a daring rewilding experiment at Knepp Estate in West Sussex, showing how a wilder countryside can benefit farming, nature and us.

Hear a panel of some of the UK's most highly respected travel journalists share their hints and tips on how to capture and record your journeys in writing, as well as their experiences on assignment.

How many people can the Earth support? Christopher encourages us to think geographically about the Earth’s carrying capacity whilst considering the perils faced by our planet and our species, and how to survive them.

The age of the smart mobile machine is upon us. Paul explores the intersection between artificial intelligence, robots and their environments, and implications for our country and our planet.

Research on microplastics has largely focused on the oceans, but what is the contribution from our rivers? Jamie will explore microplastic contamination in UK river basins and the role of floods in microplastic transport.

Between 2015 - 2019, award winning photographer Marissa Roth made seven transatlantic crossings on the Queen Mary II, resulting in a poetic photographic study of what it means to cross an ocean.

Geographical lates: climate talks

Hear from a range of experts as they discuss evolving climate science, the current policy stance, what the COP25 climate talks hope to achieve, and what you can do.

Marking 200 years since the discovery of land in Antarctica Professor David Vaughan, Jane Rumble OBE, Camilla Nichol and Professor Klaus Dodds will consider Antarctica’s history and its unique status as a continent reserved for peace and science.

No man’s lands are proliferating in today's turbulent world. Using digital archives and immersive technology, Alasdair, Noam and Elliot explore the stories of places that remain locked behind barbed wire and minefields.

"Everything happens somewhere" will be brought to life in this illustrated conversation demonstrating the power of geography to save and transform lives, working through such charities as MapAction and Addressing the Unaddressed.

International broadcaster Zeinab Badawi and Nick Westcott of the Royal African Society explore how we need to look in unexpected places to discover Africa's contemporary reality.

Our panel examines alternative visions of urban futures, covering planning, sustainability, governance and new technology, they give a sense of how everyday city life is being reimagined by geographers.

The Nekton team reveal the discoveries from ‘First Descent: Seychelles’ in their bid to help conserve 30% of the Seychelles' vast ocean territory.

Adam Weymouth tells the story of canoeing 2,000 miles down the Yukon River, investigating how the king salmon's decline is impacting on the many communities and ecosystems that depend on it for survival.

The ubiquitous use of mobile devices means that citizens can gather information like never before. But can what they contribute be geographically valuable? 

Hanifa and Marina share Hanifa's journey to become the first Afghan woman to summit Mt Noshaq (24,580').

The Brazilian Villas Boas brothers, RGS gold-medallists for remarkable explorations, used their fame to champion indigenous peoples, change attitudes to them, and protect their rainforests.

Climate change challenges: lessons from Bangladesh

Join our panel as they share their insights into how Bangladesh is now on the path to becoming climate resilient, the lessons that can be learned from this, and where things are headed.

Our panel of experts discuss the various approaches you can take to reduce the impacts of your holidays on the planet and answer the question: what does it mean to travel well?

RGS-IBG grant recipients, Katie and Karen recount their separate journeys along two rivers; the Murray and the Naryn. Whilst challenging themselves, they discovered the difficulties faced by the people who rely on rivers for their livelihoods.

Feeding a growing population from finite resources is one of the major challenges of the 21st century. Peter explores how we can achieve more sustainable and healthy systems of food production and consumption.

Andy Miller, a heritage consultant specialising in post-conflict environments, gives an overview of ongoing restoration projects in the Old City of Mosul in the aftermath of its occupation by ISIS.

After 25 years in the business, Kate explores how geographers are influencing the digital media industries - using their knowledge of cartography, cultural systems and environmental challenges, to build engaging digital worlds.

In 1969 four men successfully completed the first surface crossing of the Arctic Ocean, led by Sir Wally Herbert. On the 50th anniversary of this exceptional achievement, Kari tells their story.

The Arctic is changing. But how and where is it changing, and why does it matter to those who call it home and those who don't?

Victor tells the story of the sacred river and explains how the fate of the world's most important waterway has lessons for all the great rivers of our planet.

Desert dancing: witnessing change in Bedouin culture - EmmaLucy Cole

Living with the tribes of the Sinai, EmmaLucy experiences the Dahiyya – a largely forbidden dance where genders freely interact.

Micro-plastics, micro-scientists and micro-adventures - Taylor Butler-Eldridge

Focusing on the local and engaging the environmentalists of the future, Taylor realises the role of adventure in our struggle with one of today’s big challenges. 

The spirit of the Colombian Pacific - James Price

James journeys by foot and canoe along a remote and unvoiced coastline, to discover why the rainforest and its inhabitants are at risk.

From a mouthful to a movement: my refugee kitchen - Tom Marsden

A trip to the eastern Mediterranean becomes a journey into action in the face of the ongoing refugee crisis. Tom responds through food. Half a million meals later, he is still serving.

Paddleboarding around Langkawi to find Crusoe - Daniel Wynn

Daniel goes in search of the castaway experience in an archipelago of 99 islands. Without support, and increasingly without water, he finds it.

Fighting wildlife crime with the world's first female anti-poaching unit - Alice Bromage

Alice travels to South Africa to work with the Black Mambas on tactics, self-confidence, and the fear of lions.

On this beautiful orb, we have reached the point in our collective journey where geographical knowledge is the best guarantor of our future. Nicholas Crane makes the case for the great age of geography.

Maps can be beautiful, iconic and influential. Hugh draws on the Society's unparalleled collection to show how they have lured travellers to places from the 1600s to the present day.

Do you know where your clothes have come from? The conditions under which they have been made? And who made them?

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope.

Sir Michael Palin will retrace the history of HMS Erebus and her crew; from the part it played in Ross' Antarctic expedition of 1839-43, to its abandonment during Franklin's ill-fated Arctic expedition.

William recounts his experiences of some of the world's driest places, from the borderlands of the USA to the sacred deserts of Egypt's Desert Fathers.

Through sharing his experiences of chasing wildfires accross four continents, Thomas will explore the science of 'pyrogeography' and what it can tell us about the drivers and impacts of environmental change.

Human Cognition – developments in navigation – Jeremy Morley and Professor Kate Jeffrey

Recent neuroscience research has explored how the brain represents details of places and navigation – but how is that linked to how we navigate in the real world?

Miranda explores how powerful information about location can be used to build a system of smarter infrastructure to help the UK economy and society to thrive.

Sara returns to the thin country to mark the 25th anniversary of her bestselling book recounting a six-month journey from the Peruvian border to Chilean Antarctica.

At a moment when global cooperation is under threat, this lecture examines the history of internationalism, with particular reference to the international role of RGS-IBG.

Award-winning photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher have recorded African sacred ceremonies for the past 40 years. In words and images, they will share their experiences behind the making of their new magnum opus, African Twilight.

Drowning in plastic - Liz Bonnin

Science and wildlife presenter Liz Bonnin examines one of the biggest environmental threats facing the modern world.

Linden considers whether the Sustainable Development Goals offer a realistic roadmap for the future of our planet. Are they a unifying call or a random wish list?

Fiona reflects on why beauty matters, yet barely features in public debate and policy. She will argue that beauty is needed to moderate the increasingly commercial, economistic narrative that prevails today.

Paul will examine developments in flood risk modelling, which has long been dominated by engineers and mathematicians, and show how Geographers and their technologies have challenged and disrupted traditional approaches to understanding floods.

A career of professional diving in the world's wildest, remote, challenging and pristine places gives Paul a unique perspective of our seas. Can we be more optimistic about the future health of our Oceans?

This illustrated lecture explores beauty and ruin in the old caravansary towns of the Thar Desert in Shekhawati, and highlights conservation efforts aimed at preserving the region’s fading visual culture.

A team of novice polar explorers from across Europe and the Middle East ski across the rapidly dwindling sea ice of the Arctic Ocean in this tale of faith, hope and cultural insight.