From shadowy mangroves to the deep oceans, Helen will chart the course of seashells through history. She will explore their use as currency to their impact on modern-day technologies.

In January 2016 the Coxless Crew completed their double world record-setting Pacific Ocean row. The crew will talk about the challenges they faced and share their experiences of this epic journey.

The UK Overseas Territories include vast wilderness areas across three oceans. Mark will explore these, describing transformative approaches to conservation being tested in the British Indian Ocean Territory and elsewhere.

Each region of the world faces different population challenges – reducing fertility, employing a ‘bulge’ of young people or managing ageing populations. Sarah explores these and the global implications for the future.

David will explore the future prospects of younger people, and the state, looking at the long-term demographic, economic and political drivers of differences between the generations – one of the key issues of our time.

Drawing on a lifetime exploring British landscapes, Nicholas will describe how we have modified our habitat since the tundra thawed 12,000 years ago and why we should value our island story.

There's too much plastic in our oceans, much of it as microscopic particles. Where does it come from? Where does it do most harm? And what can we do about it?

Featuring some beautiful imagery, Melanie takes us on a scientific journey into Arctic lands to learn about the spectacular aurora.

Life off the ladder

11 million people in the UK are off the housing ladder and in private renting, up dramatically from previous generations. Over half of Londoners rent. Whether through choice or necessity, more people are renting and for longer. Should we accept that Britain’s home-owning dream has ended? Can we improve rights for renters so life off the ladder in the 21st Century can be something to celebrate not commiserate?

Geography is the discipline of our future. Humanity has become a geological superpower. Acknowledging and embracing this new idea will allow us to protect Earth's environment and its peoples.

Tristan explores how to spot the clues, signs and patterns in water; from puddles to lakes and from streams to oceans, using examples from across the world.

This illustrated assessment of Britain's impact on the world marks the 400th anniversary of the death of Richard Hakluyt, one of the UK's most influential early geographers and a historian of exploration.

An ancient eternal fuel, the highest snow passes on Earth, and the last of the great Himalayan muleteers – told by the only known westerner to travel the entire Tea Horse Road by foot.

Walking India: the Bay of Bengal to the Arabian Sea - Oli Broadhead

The experiences of a two-month crossing of Southern India: heat stroke, leopards, mountains, mosquitos, sleeping rough, and why it was all completely brilliant.

Driving around the world for microfinance - Matthieu Tordeur

Crossing deserts, mountain ranges and the Atlantic on a cargo ship, all in a 30 year-old Renault 4, Matthieu redistributed €25,000 to people actively excluded from the formal financial sector.

Cheese pies and grandmothers: adventures in Georgia - Lucy Alliott

Travelling across a country with a 33-letter alphabet and the highest mountain range in Europe has its fair share of obstacles. Grab a glass of chacha and say supra!

Puntland: to the lighthouse on the tip of the Horn of Africa - James Willcox

James travelled to the Horn of Africa in search of a lighthouse that might not even exist. This is a journey that goes to the heart of why we wish to explore.

Greenland to Canada: The Haig-Thomas Expedition 2015 - Alec Greenwell

Retracing the steps of the 1938 Haig-Thomas British Arctic Expedition, Alec observed how the social and environmental factors affecting the region have changed over the last eight decades.

Altiplano: exploring water in the Andes - Fearghal O’Nuallain

In 2015 Fearghal climbed, hitched and paddled across the Bolivian Altiplano. Fearghal examines this journey making a passionate case for why experience is essential to understanding the world.

Standing up for river science: paddle boarding the Thames - Michelle Ellison and Mel Joe

Paddle boarding the length of the Thames, Michelle and Mel tested the water quality, raising awareness about the health of the river and inspiring others to give paddle boarding a go.

Integrated Britain?

On 15 March 2016 the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) held a panel discussion to discuss whether we should be doing more to support integration of different cultures in Britain, and how we can strike a balance between integration that celebrates our similarities while respecting  our differences.

Bob explores the significance of the archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa, the current threats and pressures it faces, and the work to document and preserve sites at risk.

The former British High Commissioner to Australia and Singapore explores the many ways in which geography features in the working of modern diplomacy, illustrated with personal experiences from postings overseas and at the FCO in London.

Energy for development

Goal seven of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is ‘to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all’. But one in five people currently don’t have access to modern electricity. 21st Century Challenges held a panel discussion on Wednesday 24 February at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) to discuss how can we support local entrepreneurship and help the world’s poorest communities gain access.

Alexander von Humboldt is the great lost scientist. Historian Andrea will talk about how his ideas revolutionised science and why he is the forgotten father of environmentalism.

One of the world’s leading high-altitude climbers shares his personal stories of a lifetime of mountaineering, including the Himalayan Triple Crown in 2013, and what drives him to do it.

Dark, forgotten, golden, hopeless, wild, rising, new… The Director of the Royal African Society examines why every label diminishes Africa.

For 10 years scientists have warned of the potential for a massive earthquake in Nepal. Was the April 2015 earthquake that event or an indicator of a larger disaster to come?

An eye-opening tour of a hidden world: wannabe and might-have-been countries that, lacking diplomatic recognition or UN membership, inhabit a realm of shifting borders, idealistic leaders and forgotten peoples.

In the wake of last month’s critical UN conference in Paris, what are the prospects that the world will tackle climate change? Should we be hopeful – or despairing?