At a moment when global cooperation is under threat, this lecture examines the history of internationalism, with particular reference to the international role of RGS-IBG.

Award-winning photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher have recorded African sacred ceremonies for the past 40 years. In words and images, they will share their experiences behind the making of their new magnum opus, African Twilight.

The Sustainable Development Goals: ambition or fantasy? – Linden Edgell

Linden considers whether the Sustainable Development Goals offer a realistic roadmap for the future of our planet. Are they a unifying call or a random wish list?

Fiona reflects on why beauty matters, yet barely features in public debate and policy. She will argue that beauty is needed to moderate the increasingly commercial, economistic narrative that prevails today.

Paul will examine developments in flood risk modelling, which has long been dominated by engineers and mathematicians, and show how Geographers and their technologies have challenged and disrupted traditional approaches to understanding floods.

A career of professional diving in the world's wildest, remote, challenging and pristine places gives Paul a unique perspective of our seas. Can we be more optimistic about the future health of our Oceans?

This illustrated lecture explores beauty and ruin in the old caravansary towns of the Thar Desert in Shekhawati, and highlights conservation efforts aimed at preserving the region’s fading visual culture.

A team of novice polar explorers from across Europe and the Middle East ski across the rapidly dwindling sea ice of the Arctic Ocean in this tale of faith, hope and cultural insight.

Deborah explores how 1886 RGS Instructor in Photography, John Thompson, applied images to the science of geography, to guide and influence a new generation of travellers.

After a decade of work in West Papua, BBC presenter and journalist Will Millard was diagnosed with PTSD. This talk details both his work and trauma, and describes how a love for water has helped him recover.

Migrants on the margins is the Society's collaborative field research project, focusing on the vulnerability and opportunities of migrants in some of the world’s most pressured cities. Members of the research team outline some of their findings so far.

Leon takes us on a 1,000-mile walk from Jerusalem to Mount Sinai, exploring the culture, history and faith in one of the most complex and compelling places on earth.

Charlie talks about efforts to save Timbuktu's precious manuscripts from al-Qaeda in 2012-13, and examines the powerful myths that drew early European explorers there.

An illustrated talk that weaves together stories of the people, the landscapes and the issues facing Mongolia. Karina draws on her 16 years' experience of exploring and working in Mongolia.

In her last lecture as Director, Rita draws on her physical geography background and experience of leading the Society to explore the place of the discipline in a rapidly changing world at home and abroad.

Rod Downie shares his experience in developing innovative solutions to better understand and conserve polar bears in the rapidly changing Arctic.

The Long Way Up: Mexico to Canada on the Pacific Crest Trail – Charlie Knight

Faced with doubts and depression, Charlie took the ‘black dog’ for a walk through America.

Himalayan Popup Picturehouse: the highest cinema in the world – Emma de Heveningham

With a cinema in her pack, Emma travels to remote communities in the mountains, sharing stories at nomadic camps and monasteries.

The Wildest Journey: walking the Zambezi – Chaz Powell

Undeterred by local conflict and brutal terrain, Chaz’s source to sea walk along the wildest river was far from easy.

Running Scotland’s Watershed, a ribbon of wildness – Elspeth Luke

The first woman to complete this journey, Elspeth ran the spine of Scotland, surrounded by bogs, rain and beauty.

The Ger in the City: exploring migration in Mongolia – Hattie Field

The steppe is changing and rural nomads are moving to the cities. Hattie spent two months finding out why.

Seeking Solitude, Finding Solidarity: on foot through the Caucasus – Val Ismaili

Val's solo through-hike of the Transcaucasian Trail turned into an unexpectedly emotional journey, featuring lone shepherds, hospitable families, and homemade vodka.

Markus tackles the challenges posed by one of the world's most written about and most misunderstood countries – from nuclear threat, to refugees and the media frenzy.

The remarkable growth of Chinese cities in the last 30 years is the biggest, and possibly most rapid, process of urbanisation the world has ever seen. It has transformed China, its environment and people.

In 2014 Ben led the longest ever polar journey on foot, completing the South Pole return that defeated Scott and Shackleton. In 2017 he attempted the first solo, unsupported and unassisted crossing of Antarctica.

Levison talks about his latest expeditions, his early travels and his motivation. In considering the age old question of why people explore, he explains what draws him to the wilderness.

Devastating hurricanes, forest fires, flash floods. Vulnerable communities across the world have succumbed to all of these and more in recent months. Increasingly they are asking the question, "Is this linked to climate change?"

High street regeneration: place-making and changing spaces - Dr Steve Millington

Declining retail poses fundamental questions to the future of places where we live, work and socialise. How have these places been managed so far - and how can geographers envisage brighter futures for their development?

Dr Barbara Bond investigates MI9’s wartime escape and evasion mapping programme including how maps were smuggled to prisoners and how they helped orchestrate some of the most famous escapes in history.

With basic geographic data lacking in many low income countries, Andy explores how cell phone and satellite technologies offer new ways to help achieve and monitor the Sustainable Development Goals.

Patrick talks about his journey from sizeable small islands to ever tinier islets in search of the special quality of island life. Do small islands have big lessons for us on the mainland?

Professor Matthew Goodwin examines the drivers of the vote for Brexit, what it tells us about public opinion and party politics in Britain and what might happen next.