No man’s lands are proliferating in today's turbulent world. Using digital archives and immersive technology, Alasdair, Noam and Elliot explore the stories of places that remain locked behind barbed wire and minefields.

"Everything happens somewhere" will be brought to life in this illustrated conversation demonstrating the power of geography to save and transform lives, working through such charities as MapAction and Addressing the Unaddressed.

International broadcaster Zeinab Badawi and Nick Westcott of the Royal African Society explore how we need to look in unexpected places to discover Africa's contemporary reality.

Our panel examines alternative visions of urban futures, covering planning, sustainability, governance and new technology, they give a sense of how everyday city life is being reimagined by geographers.

The Nekton team reveal the discoveries from ‘First Descent: Seychelles’ in their bid to help conserve 30% of the Seychelles' vast ocean territory.

Adam Weymouth tells the story of canoeing 2,000 miles down the Yukon River, investigating how the king salmon's decline is impacting on the many communities and ecosystems that depend on it for survival.

The ubiquitous use of mobile devices means that citizens can gather information like never before. But can what they contribute be geographically valuable? 

Hanifa and Marina share Hanifa's journey to become the first Afghan woman to summit Mt Noshaq (24,580').

The Brazilian Villas Boas brothers, RGS gold-medallists for remarkable explorations, used their fame to champion indigenous peoples, change attitudes to them, and protect their rainforests.

Climate change challenges: lessons from Bangladesh

Join our panel as they share their insights into how Bangladesh is now on the path to becoming climate resilient, the lessons that can be learned from this, and where things are headed.

Our panel of experts discuss the various approaches you can take to reduce the impacts of your holidays on the planet and answer the question: what does it mean to travel well?

RGS-IBG grant recipients, Katie and Karen recount their separate journeys along two rivers; the Murray and the Naryn. Whilst challenging themselves, they discovered the difficulties faced by the people who rely on rivers for their livelihoods.

Feeding a growing population from finite resources is one of the major challenges of the 21st century. Peter explores how we can achieve more sustainable and healthy systems of food production and consumption.

Andy Miller, a heritage consultant specialising in post-conflict environments, gives an overview of ongoing restoration projects in the Old City of Mosul in the aftermath of its occupation by ISIS.

After 25 years in the business, Kate explores how geographers are influencing the digital media industries - using their knowledge of cartography, cultural systems and environmental challenges, to build engaging digital worlds.

In 1969 four men successfully completed the first surface crossing of the Arctic Ocean, led by Sir Wally Herbert. On the 50th anniversary of this exceptional achievement, Kari tells their story.

The Arctic is changing. But how and where is it changing, and why does it matter to those who call it home and those who don't?

Victor tells the story of the sacred river and explains how the fate of the world's most important waterway has lessons for all the great rivers of our planet.

Desert dancing: witnessing change in Bedouin culture - EmmaLucy Cole

Living with the tribes of the Sinai, EmmaLucy experiences the Dahiyya – a largely forbidden dance where genders freely interact.

Micro-plastics, micro-scientists and micro-adventures - Taylor Butler-Eldridge

Focusing on the local and engaging the environmentalists of the future, Taylor realises the role of adventure in our struggle with one of today’s big challenges. 

The spirit of the Colombian Pacific - James Price

James journeys by foot and canoe along a remote and unvoiced coastline, to discover why the rainforest and its inhabitants are at risk.

From a mouthful to a movement: my refugee kitchen - Tom Marsden

A trip to the eastern Mediterranean becomes a journey into action in the face of the ongoing refugee crisis. Tom responds through food. Half a million meals later, he is still serving.

Paddleboarding around Langkawi to find Crusoe - Daniel Wynn

Daniel goes in search of the castaway experience in an archipelago of 99 islands. Without support, and increasingly without water, he finds it.

Fighting wildlife crime with the world's first female anti-poaching unit - Alice Bromage

Alice travels to South Africa to work with the Black Mambas on tactics, self-confidence, and the fear of lions.

On this beautiful orb, we have reached the point in our collective journey where geographical knowledge is the best guarantor of our future. Nicholas Crane makes the case for the great age of geography.

Maps can be beautiful, iconic and influential. Hugh draws on the Society's unparalleled collection to show how they have lured travellers to places from the 1600s to the present day.

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope.

Sir Michael Palin will retrace the history of HMS Erebus and her crew; from the part it played in Ross' Antarctic expedition of 1839-43, to its abandonment during Franklin's ill-fated Arctic expedition.

William recounts his experiences of some of the world's driest places, from the borderlands of the USA to the sacred deserts of Egypt's Desert Fathers.

Through sharing his experiences of chasing wildfires accross four continents, Thomas will explore the science of 'pyrogeography' and what it can tell us about the drivers and impacts of environmental change.

Human Cognition – developments in navigation – Jeremy Morley and Professor Kate Jeffrey

Recent neuroscience research has explored how the brain represents details of places and navigation – but how is that linked to how we navigate in the real world?

Miranda explores how powerful information about location can be used to build a system of smarter infrastructure to help the UK economy and society to thrive.

Sara returns to the thin country to mark the 25th anniversary of her bestselling book recounting a six-month journey from the Peruvian border to Chilean Antarctica.