Emily Penn - Ocean plastics and lessons from life at sea

In this episode of Geography now, ocean advocate and skipper Emily Penn joins us to discuss her recent expedition to raise awareness of the ocean plastic problem, a new platform to help us find solutions, and what we can learn from living at sea.

What makes a successful rural community? How can community be developed? How can success be measured?

The Ness Award, poetry and icy exploration- Nancy Campbell

In this episode of Geography now, Nancy Campbell joins us to discuss her poetry, the geographical individuals who have inspired her work, and what it means to be the recipient of the 2020 Ness Award.

Take a virtual journey with photographer Beth Wald into the remote and harshly beautiful Wakhan Corridor of northeast Afghanistan.

British reintroductions - Peter Cooper

In this episode of Geography now podcast, Peter Cooper discusses animal reintroductions from a British perspective.

A tale of two seas - Professor Tom Rippeth

Professor Tom Rippeth explores the interconnectedness of the global oceans with our weather and climate.

Paul Rose takes us on an expedition across the world from your own home. 

Humanity’s tenure on Earth has had very far-reaching consequences. Joe charts the past, present and future of environmental ideas and actions to help find a way through these difficult times.

A guided virtual walk full of fascinating context and history, led by Dick Bateman.

We live in a world shaped by food: a ‘sitopia' (from Gk. sitos, food + topos, place), yet, as Covid-19 reminds us, our failure to recognise this threatens us and our planet. Yet by learning to value food once again, we can not only address the multiple threats we face, but can build better, fairer, more resilient lives for the future.

Paul reflects on life with over 50 neighbours over six years, where residents tackle the climate and now the current COVID-19 crises through living in an affordable, co-operative home ownership community made from straw and wood.

A hard day's light: racing the sun across Hadrian's Wall - Jamie Rutherford

Can Jamie Rutherford follow the wall and run the width of England before the sun sets?

In search of a 'lost' house in Bangladesh - Shreyashi Dasgupta

70 years after Partition, Shreyashi Dasgupta goes in search of her grandfather's old home.

Buried treasure: unearthing an archipelago's lost ecosystem - Alvaro Castilla-Beltrán

Alvaro Castilla-Beltrán takes us to Cape Verde to understand the impact of humans on biodiversity, exploring the soils beneath his feet.

Project Armenia: climbing above the clouds - Peter Rosso

On an expedition to scout new routes, Peter Rosso is challenged to address long-term mental health issues while high on the cliff walls.

Rhythm revolution: exploring Iran through its rich musical heritage - Ruairi Glasheen

Ruairi Glasheen meets the young musicians drumming new life into ancient Persian traditions.

Last stop in the remote Pacific - Liv Grant

Leading an expedition to the Marquesas Islands to study a rare parrot, Liv Grant treks uninhabited islands, swims shark-filled waters and joins a festival of feathers.

Around the world on nothing but optimism - Becca Marsh, Maximillian White and Joel Chevallier

Becca Marsh, Maximillian White and Joel Chevallier take adventures to misrepresented places, beginning with a trip around the globe in a £75 car.

Greenland and Antarctica are distant, unfamiliar places. We hear of giant icebergs breaking away, glaciers crumbling: but how much we do know about the fate of these great ice sheets?

‘The lines, which are so very fine’: John Harrison, William Hogarth and the trouble with drawing a line of Longitude. Katy considers how a clockmaker and an engraver played their parts in how the longitude problem was solved on paper, in London, before it could ever be resolved at sea.

Having successfully crewed the first British sailing boat to sail around the North East/North West passages in one season, David gives us his personal account of this exciting journey and the consequences of this venture.

Our expert panel look at food security and the potential role of new technology, as well as how we can be more mindful of seasonality, production processes, consumption and waste.

Peter explores how the strategic location of Singapore has historically made it a contested space and what role the island and its settlements have played across the centuries.

The Director of the world’s largest migration research project argues that inequality should be central to our thinking about migration and how inequality is an important analytical tool for understanding migration processes and outcomes.

Photographer Guillaume Bonn and curator Rozemin Keshvani discuss Bonn's photo essay on East Africa's disappearing past, barely recognisable but through the echoes of architectural ruins and fragile landscapes.

Isabella tells the story of a daring rewilding experiment at Knepp Estate in West Sussex, showing how a wilder countryside can benefit farming, nature and us.

Hear a panel of some of the UK's most highly respected travel journalists share their hints and tips on how to capture and record your journeys in writing, as well as their experiences on assignment.

How many people can the Earth support? Christopher encourages us to think geographically about the Earth’s carrying capacity whilst considering the perils faced by our planet and our species, and how to survive them.

The age of the smart mobile machine is upon us. Paul explores the intersection between artificial intelligence, robots and their environments, and implications for our country and our planet.