At a time when independent travel seems like a distant memory, Rajesh reflects upon the glory of slow travel and how it will adapt in the future.

The iconic architecture and culture that defines New York as we know it today, from the Empire State Building and Rockefeller Centre. It was Gotham's defining decade.

In this lecture Nigel challenges us to set aside our normal assumptions and take off our NHS spectacles to see the world differently and take control of our health.

Simon Leatherdale tells us why the coastal woods of the UK are under appreciated on a national level, as they represent a unique natural habitat where beach meets bough.

Food security and sustainability in post-conflict Freetown - Professor Tony Binns

Drawing on four decades of research in West Africa, Tony Binns explores the crucial role of urban agriculture in post-conflict Sierra Leone.

Two of our most recent medalists will discuss the progress of development in the Asian countryside and the threats to rural livelihoods in Peru post-Covid-19.

The history of the city - Ben Wilson

In this episode of Geography Now, critically acclaimed author Ben Wilson joins us to discuss the history of 'humankind's greatest invention', the city.

Estimates and instruments: the case for comparative maritime history - Dr Margaret Schotte

Margaret discusses the distinctive ways in which mariners from England, France, Spain and the Netherlands deployed instruments and determined their daily progress.

Coastal marine ecosystems are not only beautiful, but also reduce impacts from climate change, enhance coastal wildlife, fisheries and local economies.

This event combines a short film, a virtual exhibition tour and a Q&A to launch ‘Sense of Here’.

This lecture focuses on these dynamics in Cambodia, examining how classical dance has been mobilised to rebuild the Cambodian nation after the Khmer Rouge genocide (1975-1979).

In this short presentation, Jacki Hill-Murphy speaks to Penny Tranter about all things weather. 

Andy highlights the importance of geography and integration of new forms of dynamic spatial data in understanding disease spread, designing elimination strategies and planning for the next pandemic. 

A geographical exploration of Britain's mysterious past - Mary-Ann Ochota

In this episode of Geography Now, archaeologist Mary-Ann Ochota talks to us about the unearthed mysteries of the past, taking us on a geographical journey around Britain. 

Developing Slow Ways: a network of walking routes that connects Great Britain's towns and cities. How can we all contribute?

Having retraced Shackleton’s 1916 survival journey, Tim explains how South Georgia’s glacial melt over the past 100 years has confirmed the importance of Shackletonian leadership in tackling climate change.

This lecture examines the circumstances surrounding the abduction of Kallihirua, a member of the Inughuit community of Northern Greenland who was visited by the crew of the Assistance during the 1850–51 Franklin Search Expedition. 

Rewilding is believed to be our hope for the future, breathing life into our landscapes and rural communities. 

In this interview, Dr Bharat Pankhania talks about the coronvairus pandemic, giving a fascinating and chilling insight into its future impact on society. 

The impact of COVID-19 on the geological cycle - Alice Fugagnoli

In this episode of Geography now, geologist Alice Fugagnoli discusses her PhD research on the effect of microplastics on the geological cycle, and how the impact of COVID-19 might be seen by future generations.

Reaching for the Poles: the South Pole - Eugene Rae

From Phipps to Fiennes: a look at some of the explorers who tried to reach the North or South Poles and some who tried to do both.

Reaching for the Poles: the North Pole - Eugene Rae

From Phipps to Fiennes: a look at some of the explorers who tried to reach the North or South Poles and some who tried to do both.

A fantastic opportunity to hear from number one best-selling author, Alice Morrison, so close to finishing her latest expedition across the Sahara.

Antipodes on the page - Eugene Rae

Antipodes on the page looks at the European encounter with Australia and New Zealand from the early navigators and first colonists through to the period of inland exploration.

Seaside pleasure piers are unique heritage assets and flagship tourism attractions at Britain’s coastal resorts, but piers are increasingly under threat. 

Soil science: exciting and needed! - Dr Jenny Jones

Soil is our vital resource yet we tend to overlook it. Most people have contact with soil daily, even if only walking over it, but will rarely consider its value.

The Taylor and Francis award, football related trafficking and race in geography - Dr James Esson

Dr James Esson talks to us about his research on the irregular migration of West African males to Europe through football related human trafficking and race issues within British geography.

200 years of Antarctica - Camilla Nichol

In this episode of Geography now, Chief Executive of the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust (UKAHT) Camilla Nichol joins us to talk about the 200th year since Antarctica was sighted, and the heritage conservation work that UKAHT are involved with. 

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Kielder.

Titan beetles and geographical fieldwork - Eleanor Drinkwater

In this episode of Geography now, entomologist Eleanor Drinkwater discusses her recent fieldwork researching Titan beetles, her love of talking about invertebrates, and how she paved her unique geographical career path.

Geographers and pandemics - Dr Janey Messina

In this episode of Geography now, Dr Janey Messina talks to us about the work that she does as a geographer in the field of health, the interdisciplinarity of geography, and how geographers can help to deal with a pandemic.

Mountain pressure: Snowdonia's cultural landscape at a crossroads - John Harold

Hear Snowdonia’s various pasts and futures as a cultural landscape, as wildland, and as a people's playground.

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Fort William. Locks, lochs, glens and Bens - this virtual walk has it all.

Ocean plastics and lessons from life at sea - Emily Penn

In this episode of Geography now, ocean advocate and skipper Emily Penn joins us to discuss her recent expedition to raise awareness of the ocean plastic problem, a new platform to help us find solutions, and what we can learn from living at sea.

What makes a successful rural community? How can community be developed? How can success be measured?

The Ness Award, poetry and icy exploration- Nancy Campbell

In this episode of Geography now, Nancy Campbell joins us to discuss her poetry, the geographical individuals who have inspired her work, and what it means to be the recipient of the 2020 Ness Award.

Take a virtual journey with photographer Beth Wald into the remote and harshly beautiful Wakhan Corridor of northeast Afghanistan.

British reintroductions - Peter Cooper

In this episode of Geography now podcast, Peter Cooper discusses animal reintroductions from a British perspective.

A tale of two seas - Professor Tom Rippeth

Professor Tom Rippeth explores the interconnectedness of the global oceans with our weather and climate.

Paul Rose takes us on an expedition across the world from your own home. 

Humanity’s tenure on Earth has had very far-reaching consequences. Joe charts the past, present and future of environmental ideas and actions to help find a way through these difficult times.

A guided virtual walk full of fascinating context and history, led by Dick Bateman.

We live in a world shaped by food: a ‘sitopia' (from Gk. sitos, food + topos, place), yet, as Covid-19 reminds us, our failure to recognise this threatens us and our planet. Yet by learning to value food once again, we can not only address the multiple threats we face, but can build better, fairer, more resilient lives for the future.

Paul reflects on life with over 50 neighbours over six years, where residents tackle the climate and now the current COVID-19 crises through living in an affordable, co-operative home ownership community made from straw and wood.

A hard day's light: racing the sun across Hadrian's Wall - Jamie Rutherford

Can Jamie Rutherford follow the wall and run the width of England before the sun sets?

In search of a 'lost' house in Bangladesh - Shreyashi Dasgupta

70 years after Partition, Shreyashi Dasgupta goes in search of her grandfather's old home.

Buried treasure: unearthing an archipelago's lost ecosystem - Alvaro Castilla-Beltrán

Alvaro Castilla-Beltrán takes us to Cape Verde to understand the impact of humans on biodiversity, exploring the soils beneath his feet.

Project Armenia: climbing above the clouds - Peter Rosso

On an expedition to scout new routes, Peter Rosso is challenged to address long-term mental health issues while high on the cliff walls.

Rhythm revolution: exploring Iran through its rich musical heritage - Ruairi Glasheen

Ruairi Glasheen meets the young musicians drumming new life into ancient Persian traditions.

Last stop in the remote Pacific - Liv Grant

Leading an expedition to the Marquesas Islands to study a rare parrot, Liv Grant treks uninhabited islands, swims shark-filled waters and joins a festival of feathers.

Around the world on nothing but optimism - Becca Marsh, Maximillian White and Joel Chevallier

Becca Marsh, Maximillian White and Joel Chevallier take adventures to misrepresented places, beginning with a trip around the globe in a £75 car.

Greenland and Antarctica are distant, unfamiliar places. We hear of giant icebergs breaking away, glaciers crumbling: but how much we do know about the fate of these great ice sheets?

‘The lines, which are so very fine’: John Harrison, William Hogarth and the trouble with drawing a line of Longitude. Katy considers how a clockmaker and an engraver played their parts in how the longitude problem was solved on paper, in London, before it could ever be resolved at sea.

Having successfully crewed the first British sailing boat to sail around the North East/North West passages in one season, David gives us his personal account of this exciting journey and the consequences of this venture.

The future of food

Our expert panel look at food security and the potential role of new technology, as well as how we can be more mindful of seasonality, production processes, consumption and waste.

Peter explores how the strategic location of Singapore has historically made it a contested space and what role the island and its settlements have played across the centuries.

The Director of the world’s largest migration research project argues that inequality should be central to our thinking about migration and how inequality is an important analytical tool for understanding migration processes and outcomes.

Photographer Guillaume Bonn and curator Rozemin Keshvani discuss Bonn's photo essay on East Africa's disappearing past, barely recognisable but through the echoes of architectural ruins and fragile landscapes.

Isabella tells the story of a daring rewilding experiment at Knepp Estate in West Sussex, showing how a wilder countryside can benefit farming, nature and us.

Hear a panel of some of the UK's most highly respected travel journalists share their hints and tips on how to capture and record your journeys in writing, as well as their experiences on assignment.

How many people can the Earth support? Christopher encourages us to think geographically about the Earth’s carrying capacity whilst considering the perils faced by our planet and our species, and how to survive them.

The age of the smart mobile machine is upon us. Paul explores the intersection between artificial intelligence, robots and their environments, and implications for our country and our planet.