Be Inspired: Shackleton’s ghost writer: are authorship standards always important? - Art Gertel

Using the historical drama of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s Endurance voyage and subsequent publications, Art Gertel will juxtapose authorship criteria between popular and scientific/medical literature.

Sarah examines power, politics and offshore renminbi market making in London.

Emma is the first person to run across Africa from Henties Bay, Namibia to Pemba, Mozambique. In this talk, she shares the lessons learned on this and other adventures.

Professor Joanna Haigh will outline the scientific evidence for a human influence on climate and discuss pathways to limit the rate of global warming and its disastrous impacts.

Back in 1890, trailblazer Nellie Bly circled the globe faster than anyone ever had - in 72 days. 125 years later, Rosemary followed in her global footsteps and has now written Nellie's biography.

Hear from Quintin Lake about his photographic project The Perimeter, and see some of the amazing images that he captured around the coast of Britain on a journey where "each footstep leads to different surprises, beauty and strangeness".

Archives and collections assembled as part of colonial projects are troubling presences in our cultural and scientific institutions. 

The state of nature – and why should we even care? - Dr Mark Wright

In this Covid-19 world there has been a renewed interest in looking at our relationship with nature. This talk will explore what is the real state of nature and what underpins the significant changes we are seeing.

Explore beneath the muddy waters of Mozambique to discover the forces that cause floods, and see how global flood forecasting is helping people cheat fate and choose their own destiny.

Be Inspired: Always ready for an expedition - Natalie Cox

This talk recounts the extraordinary life of explorer Richard Burton whilst embracing the wider history of 19th century science.

In this talk, Michael Poland will discuss some of this science, as well as the hits and misses of science communication efforts regarding Yellowstone's volcanic character.

Photographer Kiliii Yüyan illuminates stories of the Arctic and human communities connected to the land. Informed by ancestry that is both Nanai/Hèzhé (East Asian Indigenous) and Chinese-American, he explores the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives.

Canoeing through Covid: citizen science on the Severn

As the lockdown lifts, Alex McDermott and friends re-plan with a new aim: to explore Covid’s impact on a river, its people, and the wider environment.

Chernobyl: time travel to 1986

Yulia Savchuk returns to her native Ukraine, chasing childhood memories and examining what the Soviet era could teach us about living with ‘invisible killers’.

Our flat Earth: adventures of a digital detective

Starting from sepia photos in an album, Emma de Heveningham unpicks the mystery of her grandfather’s time in South America, tracing his footsteps across a screen with her fingertips.

Pushing the limits: life and death at the sharp end

Having traversed Antarctica by ski, Dr Alex Brazier is no stranger to working in a team under pressure. Now, his work in a busy ICU through a pandemic brings new insights into stamina and resilience.

Voices of the Maya: discovery and language in Belize

Charlotte Austwick takes us to a jungle village, where she helps the community secure cultural survival through the creation of Q’eqchi’ and Mopan Maya illustrated reading books.

There’s more to a Dragon than meets the eye: the Wales Coast Path

Along 870 miles of Welsh shores, Zoe Langley-Wathen reshapes her view of the country, and despite the moods of the Dragon, becomes the first woman to walk the route.

To weigh the Earth: lessons from east Greenland

Richard Phillips leads a month-long traverse across tough ground, a journey of exploration and science that leads his students to reinterpret their sense of place.

Back in the saddle: cycling the Iron Curtain

After a spine injury ends her prospects of a sports career, Laura Scott packs up her life and cycles 5500 miles from the Arctic Circle to the Black Sea. Solo.

Geographical journeys: microlectures

Eight speakers have just 10 minutes each to share their geographical journeys in an illustrated talk.

Project UKFall: Retrieving meteorites and why it's important - Dr Luke Daly

This talk will give you an opportunity to discover how projects like UKFall are tracking fireballs to recover meteorites, providing new insights into our solar system's history.

Paul Clements delves into the Shannon heartland on a foot-stepping quest to recreate the trip of Richard Hayward 80 years earlier.

There are over 250 lost or ruined churches and religious building remains in Norfolk. Illustrating these with his sublime photographs, Clive gives us a tour of these wonderful structures.

Sue Watt takes us on a journey across the continent’s sub Saharan regions to show how vital sustainable tourism can be for the people and wildlife of these countries.

Our panel will take you around the globe to witness some of the most extreme natural hazards.

A panel featuring contributors to the Geography Directions blog discussing latest geographical research on the economic impacts of COVID-19, with a particular focus on food supply.

Hear Chris explain the meaning behind mask rituals and why humans have worn masks since the dawn of civilization.

Be Inspired: Genealogy, geography and archives - Chandan Mahal

This talk recounts how people of Punjabi descent worked with the Society's archive to explore the places associated with their ancestral heritage.

Earth Photo: in conversation with winning photographers

Each year the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Forestry England and Parker Harris host the Earth Photo competition, attracting contributions from around the world. This event brings together winning photographers for personal presentations and a panel discussion.

Join our panel as we discuss the ethics of wildlife encounters.

Hear Hilary and Janice tell us about their visit to Socotra, with its pink rocks, chubby desert roses and dragon’s blood trees like giant mushrooms.

Communicating and understanding risk in dynamic situations

The first in a new series of fireside chats led by the Disaster Risk Management Professional Practice Group, bringing together industry experts from a range of sectors and backgrounds to explore issues facing disaster risk management.

A look at the developments in 3D visualisation of geodata and the interactions between the geospatial and simulation communities that are driving new technological developments in this area. 

Professor Larner challenges accounts of the ‘neoliberal university’ by discussing the growing recognition that research excellence takes multiple forms.

The Norfolk Broads are made up of over 150 miles of navigable waterways.

Join Bjørn Heyerdahl, the grandson of Thor, as he recounts his expedition around South Africa's Cape of Storms in a traditional wooden Viking boat with a team of world class explorers.

British explorer Bertram Thomas became the first person to cross the largest sand desert on Earth. Hear how Mark and his Omani companions retraced Thomas’s footsteps on their own 49 day journey from Salalah to Doha.

From vast deserts and deep oceans to dinosaur-filled swamps, the Jurassic Coast is one of the world's greatest geological wonders.

Be Inspired: Woman with the iceberg eyes - Katherine Macinnes

From housewife to CBE and NHM collector, Woman with the Iceberg Eyes traces the fascinating story of an Edwardian lady after whom Oriana Ridge, Antarctica, is named.

Discover how bears and people coexist in the Interandean dry forests of Bolivia through the themes of changing attitudes and perceptions, increasing tolerances, and finding economic alternatives to livestock.

In this talk hear leading cartographer with the British Antarctic Survey explain the development of his latest map series that unfold new stories of Antarctica.

Be Inspired: Travellers in the Great Steppe: uncovering a hidden history - Nick Fielding

In his new history of the exploration of the steppes, Nick Fielding shows that there is a hidden and far more diverse history for this vast region that is commonly known in the West.

Explore the exquisite balance of nature in the Yukon Territory, including the waxing and waning of the iconic lynx, snowshoe hare, and abalone fishers.

This lecture introduces the life of travel writer and photographer Eric Newby and the times in which he lived, following the recent donation of his archives to the Society.