Desert dancing: witnessing change in Bedouin culture - EmmaLucy Cole

Living with the tribes of the Sinai, EmmaLucy experiences the Dahiyya – a largely forbidden dance where genders freely interact.

Micro-plastics, micro-scientists and micro-adventures - Taylor Butler-Eldridge

Focusing on the local and engaging the environmentalists of the future, Taylor realises the role of adventure in our struggle with one of today’s big challenges. 

The spirit of the Colombian Pacific - James Price

James journeys by foot and canoe along a remote and unvoiced coastline, to discover why the rainforest and its inhabitants are at risk.

From a mouthful to a movement: my refugee kitchen - Tom Marsden

A trip to the eastern Mediterranean becomes a journey into action in the face of the ongoing refugee crisis. Tom responds through food. Half a million meals later, he is still serving.

Paddleboarding around Langkawi to find Crusoe - Daniel Wynn

Daniel goes in search of the castaway experience in an archipelago of 99 islands. Without support, and increasingly without water, he finds it.

Fighting wildlife crime with the world's first female anti-poaching unit - Alice Bromage

Alice travels to South Africa to work with the Black Mambas on tactics, self-confidence, and the fear of lions.

Human Cognition – developments in navigation – Jeremy Morley and Professor Kate Jeffrey

Recent neuroscience research has explored how the brain represents details of places and navigation – but how is that linked to how we navigate in the real world?

A team of novice polar explorers from across Europe and the Middle East ski across the rapidly dwindling sea ice of the Arctic Ocean in this tale of faith, hope and cultural insight.

The Long Way Up: Mexico to Canada on the Pacific Crest Trail – Charlie Knight

Faced with doubts and depression, Charlie took the ‘black dog’ for a walk through America.

Himalayan Popup Picturehouse: the highest cinema in the world – Emma de Heveningham

With a cinema in her pack, Emma travels to remote communities in the mountains, sharing stories at nomadic camps and monasteries.

The Wildest Journey: walking the Zambezi – Chaz Powell

Undeterred by local conflict and brutal terrain, Chaz’s source to sea walk along the wildest river was far from easy.

Running Scotland’s Watershed, a ribbon of wildness – Elspeth Luke

The first woman to complete this journey, Elspeth ran the spine of Scotland, surrounded by bogs, rain and beauty.

The Ger in the City: exploring migration in Mongolia – Hattie Field

The steppe is changing and rural nomads are moving to the cities. Hattie spent two months finding out why.

Seeking Solitude, Finding Solidarity: on foot through the Caucasus – Val Ismaili

Val's solo through-hike of the Transcaucasian Trail turned into an unexpectedly emotional journey, featuring lone shepherds, hospitable families, and homemade vodka.

Life off the ladder

11 million people in the UK are off the housing ladder and in private renting, up dramatically from previous generations. Over half of Londoners rent. Whether through choice or necessity, more people are renting and for longer. Should we accept that Britain’s home-owning dream has ended? Can we improve rights for renters so life off the ladder in the 21st Century can be something to celebrate not commiserate?

Walking India: the Bay of Bengal to the Arabian Sea - Oli Broadhead

The experiences of a two-month crossing of Southern India: heat stroke, leopards, mountains, mosquitos, sleeping rough, and why it was all completely brilliant.

Driving around the world for microfinance - Matthieu Tordeur

Crossing deserts, mountain ranges and the Atlantic on a cargo ship, all in a 30 year-old Renault 4, Matthieu redistributed €25,000 to people actively excluded from the formal financial sector.

Cheese pies and grandmothers: adventures in Georgia - Lucy Alliott

Travelling across a country with a 33-letter alphabet and the highest mountain range in Europe has its fair share of obstacles. Grab a glass of chacha and say supra!

Puntland: to the lighthouse on the tip of the Horn of Africa - James Willcox

James travelled to the Horn of Africa in search of a lighthouse that might not even exist. This is a journey that goes to the heart of why we wish to explore.

Greenland to Canada: The Haig-Thomas Expedition 2015 - Alec Greenwell

Retracing the steps of the 1938 Haig-Thomas British Arctic Expedition, Alec observed how the social and environmental factors affecting the region have changed over the last eight decades.

Altiplano: exploring water in the Andes - Fearghal O’Nuallain

In 2015 Fearghal climbed, hitched and paddled across the Bolivian Altiplano. Fearghal examines this journey making a passionate case for why experience is essential to understanding the world.

Standing up for river science: paddle boarding the Thames - Michelle Ellison and Mel Joe

Paddle boarding the length of the Thames, Michelle and Mel tested the water quality, raising awareness about the health of the river and inspiring others to give paddle boarding a go.

Integrated Britain?

On 15 March 2016 the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) held a panel discussion to discuss whether we should be doing more to support integration of different cultures in Britain, and how we can strike a balance between integration that celebrates our similarities while respecting  our differences.

Energy for development

Goal seven of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) is ‘to ensure access to affordable, reliable, sustainable and modern energy for all’. But one in five people currently don’t have access to modern electricity. 21st Century Challenges held a panel discussion on Wednesday 24 February at the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG) to discuss how can we support local entrepreneurship and help the world’s poorest communities gain access.

Climate Change

Fossil fuels like coal and oil contain a high percentage of carbon and burning them releases carbon dioxide. Carbon Dioxide is a greenhouse gas that traps heat in the atmosphere resulting in global temperature rises. Rises in temperature increase the likelihood of extreme weather events such as storms, droughts, heat waves and floods. Changes in temperature can also have impacts on agriculture and food prices, infrastructure, human health and human and animal migration patterns.

London: Too big to succeed?

London competes on a global stage, but what price does its infrastructure pay for doing so? With growing pressure on housing, transport and public services, is it time to rethink growth in the capital?

Made in Britain?

Manufacturing in the UK has changed. Globalisation has increased competition and opened up new markets, new technology has increased efficiency, and 3D printing, the Maker movement, and online marketplaces such as Etsy have democratised the sector. Heavy industry of the 1960’s has been replaced with high-value production, and the UK now exports a diverse range of goods including electronics and plastics, pharmaceuticals, chocolate and beer, aerospace and defence equipment, furniture and textiles.

A Persian pursuit - Shirin Shabestari

Born in Iran, Shirin spent most of her childhood trekking with her father; however, her most life-changing journey was to go from being a full-time mum to leading an expedition to climb Iran’s highest peak, the 5,671m high Damavand. This was a journey intent on changing perceptions about modern day Iran, its people and its heritage.

Rwanda 20 years on: a week to remember - Fergus Oleary Simpson

Last year Rwandans commemorated the 20th anniversary of the 1994 genocide. Fergus was in Kigali over this period and attended genocide memorial ceremonies, massacre sites and interviewed a number of survivors. He reflects on Genocide Memorial Week and where Rwanda now finds itself in the modern world.

And then there were three: tandem touring with an infant in Arctic Norway - Anne Pinney

Anne cycled the northern coastline of Norway with her husband, fellow tandem cyclist David, and their 10 month old son. Hear about her journey; the white sandy beaches of the Vesterålen and Lofoten Islands, the beauty of mountains and fjords, and the pain of a 1,400km ride in the Arctic... with a cot, high chair and nappies!

Life in the plug: a journey through the forests of Panama - John Fuller

A journey to the Darién Province to visit ancient stone petroglyphs recorded by the explorer Robert Hyman in 1994. John recounts his stay in an Embera village, at the end of the Sambu River, expressing how he was fortunate enough to discover two new petroglyph sites whilst trekking in the surrounding forest.

Footsteps beyond the pond - Daniel Evans

From its pristine wilderness and bounty of flora and fauna, to its quaint settlements, Alaska is a source of hope. Daniel shares experiences of its unique and thriving landscape, and its revitalising weather. From the celestial dance of the Aurora Borealis, to cycling into a moose, Alaska will be forever lodged in Daniel's memory.

Sea turtles and hurricanes - Julia Ganis

The Jumby Bay Hawksbill Project has been studying the nesting habits of sea turtles for 28 years. Julia spent time with the project in the West Indies not only gaining hands-on experience with the critically endangered species – both nesting and hatching – but she also experienced the rapid development of Hurricane Gonzalo first hand.

Mahaweli Challenge: Sri Lanka's longest river on foot and by kayak - Ian Packham

Having never kayaked before, Ian set off to hike and paddle Sri Lanka’s longest river from source to sea. From the country’s third highest peak – Totapola Kanda – Ian travelled through tea plantations, ancient city-states, and modern tourist destinations. This journey challenged his ideas of river travel and demonstrated the difficulties of water security for developing nations.

Gender equality in education

Millions of girls and young women across the world still face huge barriers to education. What are these barriers and what inspirational initiatives are working to help overcome them? How can their success be replicated to ensure that young people everywhere have the human right to education and we empower girls to the benefit of everyone?

Air pollution

The World Health Organisation (WHO) attributed 3.7 million premature deaths worldwide in 2012 to outdoor air pollution and even more, 4.3 million deaths to indoor air pollution. Exposure to toxic smoke from burning solid fuels such as wood and coal is a particular problem in Asia and Africa. How can we prevent deaths across the world from polluted air?

Wellbeing and cities

We are now very much an urban species. By 2050 three-quarters of the global population are expected to live in cities and globally we will be building the equivalent of a new city the size of Birmingham every week for the next 30 years. Such rapid urbanisation brings challenges, not just to the physical environment but also to quality of life and people’s subjective feelings of wellbeing, happiness and life satisfaction

Changing class systems

The global class system is changing. By 2030, two billion people will join the middle class from emerging economies, leaving Europe and North America with less than a third of the total middle class population. What impact is this having on people and planet?

Big Data

We are living in a data explosion where we generate and consume data faster than we can keep track of and secure. What are we going to do with all this data and how can we unlock its potential to make it work for society?

Food security

Our global food system is under increasing strain. A changing climate, pests, and stresses on water and land use have made life increasingly difficult for farmers. Raising livestock for meat also uses a lot of land and energy which is under increasing demand from a rising population and growing middle class.How can we produce and supply enough safe and nutritious food in a sustainable way to a population which is expected to rise to 9 billion by 2050?

Countryside in crisis?

Britain’s biodiversity is fragile. Bee pollutions are declining and plant and animal diseases like bovine TB and Ash dieback threaten the health of our countryside. What are the risks and are we doing enough?

Energy-Water-Food Stress Nexus

The world’s water, energy and food systems are tightly linked. Water is needed to extract energy and generate power; energy is needed to treat and transport water; and both water and energy are needed to grow food. In the coming decades, this relationship, known as the energy-water-food nexus will come under great pressure and is appearing on the agendas of governments, NGOs and businesses. How can we manage our valuable resources?

Urbanisation

Humans are rapidly becoming an urban species, with millions of people migrating to cities each year. Over half of the world’s population live in urban areas and this is likely to reach 70% of the population by 2050. How will urban centres across the world keep pace with predicted continuing growth? What are the visions of tomorrow’s cities?