Annual International Conference 2019

The perfect opportunity to find out about the latest geographical research while networking with over 1,800 delegates from around the world.

Mountain treasures from the RGS-IBG and Mountain Heritage archives - Eugene Rae

Archivist Eugene Rae will select some unique artefacts from the Society's Collections and will be joined by one of the Mountain Heritage Trust curators.

Origins: how the Earth made us – Professor Lewis Dartnell

When we talk about human history, we tend to focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us?

Origins: how the Earth made us – Professor Lewis Dartnell

When we talk about human history, we tend to focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us?

Origins: how the Earth made us – Professor Lewis Dartnell

When we talk about human history, we tend to focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us?
 

Springwatch unwrapped – Gillian Burke

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope.

Origins: how the Earth made us – Professor Lewis Dartnell

When we talk about human history, we tend to focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us?

Origins: how the Earth made us – Professor Lewis Dartnell

When we talk about human history, we tend to focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us?

New insights to the British ice sheet – Professor Rich Chiverrell

This talk examines the pace of retreat of the whole ice sheet, focusing on past environments in northwest England in order to provide an understanding of ice sheet dynamics up to 28,000 years ago.
 

Origins: how the Earth made us – Professor Lewis Dartnell

When we talk about human history, we tend to focus on great leaders, mass migration and decisive wars. But how has the Earth itself determined our destiny? How has our planet made us?
 

Flooding today and tomorrow - Ceri Davies

Ceri Davies, from Natural Resources Wales, will speak on the topic of flooding. Joint event with Cardiff University School of Earth and Ocean Sciences.

How river catchments respond to rainfall – Dr James Cooper

Dr James Cooper provides an overview of how we monitor and predict catchment response, and analyses why catchments respond in different ways to storm events.

On horseback round the Lake District - Clare Dyson

A long-held dream, a brave pony, a loyal dog, rolling fells, crystal clear rivers, lush woodlands, wild camping, lovely people, high mountain tops and rocky mountain passes... all in the UK Lake District.

Antarctica and climate change – Professor Michael Hambrey

Professor Mike Hambrey will explore the evidence of climate change in Antarctica since its great ice sheet developed, drawing on geological evidence and ice core data.

The Real Heroes of Telemark - Martin Pailthorpe

The logistics behind filming the true story of Hitler’s atomic bomb programme, featuring interviews with survivors and re-enactment of key moments. How did the extraordinary truth differ from the Hollywood blockbuster account?

International migration: busting myths - Dr Francisco Row

Globally, 258 million people lived outside their country of birth in 2017. This talk discusses patterns of international migration and offers empirical evidence to bust common misconceptions about the impact of immigration on host countries.

In pursuit of the world's wildest places – Mike O'Shea

Join us for this regional Annual Dinner and reception. Our speaker will be Mike O'Shea, who will talk about his bid to become the first person in history to make it to all six of the world's most inaccessible places.

John Ruskin, Japan and the craft tradition – Urasenke Foundation

A celebration of the arts and crafts traditions of Japan and Great Britain, inspired by the legacy of John Ruskin.

To Eritrea and Ethiopia: retracing a Victorian expedition – John Pilkington

John will discuss how, in 1868, Queen Victoria’s government mounted a bid to rescue a small clutch of hostages in the Abyssinian highlands.

 

An evening with Alan Hinkes OBE

Alan Hinkes is the first and only Briton to climb all 14 of the world's highest mountains.

Conserving Antarctica’s historic huts – Geoff Cooper

Join Geoff Cooper for an illustrated talk about the important conservation work on buildings used during early exploration of the Ross Sea and Antarctic peninsula.

Unlocking sustainable cities - Professor Paul Chatterton

Paul Chatterton will outline his new book Unlocking Sustainable Cities, and argue that this is a manifesto for real urban change.

Radar monitoring of coastal change: revealing new behaviours – Professor Andy Plater

Andy explores the use of marine radar and associated technologies for mapping shorelines and capturing data on coastal hydrodynamics, and how this can be used for planning for achieving coastal resilience.

Pluto’s ‘desert’: ice dunes on a glacier on an airless world – Dr Matt Telfer

NASA images of Pluto showed apparent dune formations, which weren’t believed possible. A team, led by geographers, solved this puzzle.

Dealing with disease: evaluating global and local responses – Gill Miller

In this talk, Gill explores the challenges facing global and local stakeholders in dealing with disease in the developing world.

Heart of Brazil – Sue Cunningham

Sue will discuss the lives of 48 indigenous tribal communities who live along the Xingu River, a tributary of the Amazon in this beautiful area of Brazil.

Climate change: science and politics – David Warrilow OBE

Any science with societal relevance soon finds it must engage with a different world, where opinion and conviction may count for more than evidence. How do scientists bring objectivity to debate?

British Everest expeditions 1921-1953 – Eugene Rae

An RGS-IBG Collections and artefacts talk by Eugene Rae, the Society’s Principal Librarian.

When the sea level rises: the UK villages lost to the sea – Dr Claire Earlie

Join Dr Claire Earlie, lecturer in coastal processes at Cardiff University, as she speaks about the UK villages lost to the sea.

Map, chart, slide and artefacts evening

A chance to hear members' own stories, talking for 10 minutes about their travels, treasures and experiences.

Cycling USA – Mark Pritchard

In May 2018 long distance cyclist Mark rode 3,400 miles from Los Angeles to Boston in 44 days to find out what makes America and Americans tick.

Mountains – Richard Matthews

Hear about Richard's trek along the Slovenia Mountain Trail, and how he discovers that, beyond the breathtaking scenery, this 600km trail is also a place of profound understanding.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The making of the British landscape: an illustrated talk – Nicholas Crane

Nicholas Crane, RGS-IBG Immediate Past President, will give the 55th Annual Tyneside Geographical Society Lecture.

Who governs Britain? Lessons from the nuclear industry – Dr Stephen Haraldsen

As nationalisation versus privatisation arguments re-emerge, Stephen will explore the rescaling of nuclear industry governance to draw wider lessons for contemporary Britain.

Tenochtitlan: the capital of the Aztecs - Dr Elizabeth Baquedano

A visitor to downtown Mexico City might not realise that this was once a lake where, in 1325, the wandering Aztecs found their promised land. Systematic excavations of this site have been ongoing since 1978.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The wake of the whale - Professor Russell Fielding

Russell will describe the cultural traditions in Faroese and Vincentian whaling and how they impact on current sustainability practices.

Geographical smörgåsbord

A buffet-style showcase of some of the most exciting and original new work examining environmental issues.

A night of geopolitics – Professor Danny Dorling and Professor Klaus Dodds

Danny Dorling discuss inequality and what Brexit teaches us about the British, while Klaus will be asking 'who owns the Arctic?'

International organisations: creators of our world – Dr Kirsten Haack

Kirsten will define international organisations and their various functions before considering how the UN has shaped our understanding of development and poverty, and how this has impacted on development policy.

Have camera, will travel - Sarah Canton

Join Sarah on her travels from South India to The Hebrides, a photographic journey spanning two decades of adventure.

Hidden histories of women and exploration - Dr Sarah Evans

Dr Sarah Evans will speak about women’s participation in RGS-supported expeditions between 1913 and 1970.

Geographical journeys: microlectures

An evening packed with tales of adventure and discovery to entertain and inspire, hosted by Mary-Ann Ochota. 

Sail Britain: learning on the seas, connecting with the ocean - Oliver Beardon

See the blue planet from an entirely new perspective: where scientists, sailors, artists and researchers meet on the seas of the UK's coastline.

The forgotten forests of Latin America – Professor Toby Pennington

Toby will describe the beautiful tropical dry forests and woody savannas of Latin America, the threats they face and what we can do to ensure they have a safe future.

Cape Town to Norfolk in a 1959 Riley – Robert Chalmers

Robert recounts key aspects of travelling overland through sub-Saharan Africa, Turkey, Iran and back to the UK.

Neanderthal landscapes of the channel river valley - Rebecca Scott

Rebecca Scott, from the British Museum, discusses the Neanderthal landscapes of the channel river valley.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Impacts of 1.5ºC of warming on coastal and marine system – Dr Sally Brown

One of the lead authors of the IPCC October 2018 report chapter on ‘Impacts on Natural and Human Systems’, Sally will speak on the impacts of 1.5°C of warming on coastal and marine areas, particularly in the South of England.

Less is more: community conservation in the rainforest – Matthew Owen

With the majority of tropical deforestation taking place in small plots, rainforest protection depends on local communities. Cool Earth has pioneered a light touch model that puts local people in control.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls – Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The rise (and fall) of studentification - Professor Tony Champion

This talk considers the colonisation of residential neighbourhoods by university students and some recent changes in student and developer behaviours which may help to curb the further expansion of studentified residential areas.

Fur seals, whales, candles and soap - Brian Anderson

Stunning images show what a difference the last 50 years of international protection has had on species in the South Atlantic.

Geography and technology: field reconnaissance from your desktop – Dr Leanne Wake

An interactive demonstration of open source software that can be used to search remotely sensed imagery for suitable field sites and reduce time and expense in the field.

 

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.