Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The making of the British landscape: an illustrated talk - Nicholas Crane

Nicholas Crane, RGS-IBG Immediate Past President will give the 55th Annual Tyneside Geographical Society Lecture.

Who governs Britain? Lessons from the nuclear industry – Dr Stephen Haraldsen

As nationalisation versus privatisation arguments re-emerge, Stephen will explore the rescaling of nuclear industry governance to draw wider lessons for contemporary Britain.

Tenochtitlan: the capital of the Aztecs - Dr Elizabeth Baquedano

A visitor to downtown Mexico City might not realise that this was once a lake where, in 1325, the wandering Aztecs found their promised land. Systematic excavations of this site have been ongoing since 1978.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The wake of the whale - Professor Russell Fielding

Russell will describe the cultural traditions in Faroese and Vincentian whaling and how they impact on current sustainability practices.

Geographical smörgåsbord

A buffet-style showcase of some of the most exciting and original new work examining environmental issues.

A night of geopolitics - Professor Danny Dorling and Professor Klaus Dodds

Danny will be talking about inequality and what Brexit teaches us about the British, whilst Klaus will be asking "who owns the Arctic?"

International organisations: creators of our world - Dr Kirsten Haack

Kirsten will define international organisations and their various functions before considering how the UN has shaped our understanding of development and poverty, and how this has impacted on development policy.

Have camera, will travel - Sarah Canton

Join Sarah on her travels from South India to The Hebrides, a photographic journey spanning two decades of adventure.

Hidden histories of women and exploration - Dr Sarah Evans

Dr Sarah Evans will speak about women’s participation in RGS-supported expeditions between 1913 and 1970.

Geographical journeys: microlectures

An evening packed with tales of adventure and discovery to entertain and inspire, hosted by Mary-Ann Ochota. 

Sail Britain: learning on the seas, connecting with the ocean - Oliver Beardon

See the blue planet from an entirely new perspective: where scientists, sailors, artists and researchers meet on the seas of the UK's coastline.

The forgotten forests of Latin America - Professor Toby Pennington

Toby will describe the beautiful tropical dry forests and woody savannas of Latin America, the threats they face and what we can do to ensure they have a safe future.

Cape Town to Norfolk in a 1959 Riley - Robert Chalmers

Robert recounts key aspects of travelling overland through sub-Saharan Africa, Turkey, Iran and back to the UK.

Neanderthal landscapes of the channel river valley - Rebecca Scott

Rebecca Scott, from the British Museum, discusses the Neanderthal landscapes of the channel river valley.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Impacts of 1.5ºC of warming on coastal and marine system - Dr Sally Brown

One of the lead authors of the IPCC October 2018 report chapter on ‘Impacts on Natural and Human Systems’, Sally will speak on the impacts of 1.5°C of warming on coastal and marine areas, particularly in the South of England.

Less is more: community conservation in the rainforest - Matthew Owen

With the majority of tropical deforestation taking place in small plots, rainforest protection depends on local communities. Cool Earth has pioneered a light touch model that puts local people in control.
 

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The rise (and fall) of studentification - Professor Tony Champion

This talk considers the colonisation of residential neighbourhoods by university students and some recent changes in student and developer behaviours which may help to curb the further expansion of studentified residential areas.

Geography and technology: field reconnaissance from your desktop - Dr Leanne Wake

An interactive demonstration of open source software to search remotely sensed imagery for suitable field sites to reduce time and expense in the field.

 

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Globalisation and the future of the city - Dr Robert Cowley

Rob describes the processes of globalisation and outlines some changes in the way cities have become imagined relating to these processes.  He identifies four internationally influential sets of ideas which offer urban solutions and illustrates how these ideas have been put into practice on the ground.

Guerilla geographies - Dan Raven-Ellison

For this spring's Mark Blacksell Memorial Lecture, Dan Raven-Ellison will be speaking about Guerrilla Geographies.

The Polar Ocean Challenge - Sir David Hempleman-Adams

David crewed the first British sailing boat to sail around the Northeast/Northwest passages in one season and will give us his personal exciting account of this epic journey and its consequences.
 

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

The last radioactive woodpecker - Charles Barder

Charles Barder will be speaking about motoring from the splendour of Goodwood to the steppes of Mongolia with no route, no backup... and one mid-life crisis. 

Of Darwin and dwarfs: sea levels, ice ages and evolution - Professor Adrian Lister

Join Professor Adrian Lister from the Natural History Museum for a talk on sea levels, ice ages and evolution.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Endangered or vulnerable: lessons from snow leopard research: Ian Convery and Volker Deeke

Combining camera trap data and environmental modelling a team of University of Cumbria researchers set out to investigate the state of a snow leopard population in Kazakhstan's Ile Alatau mountains.

A new Arctic in the making - Professor Klaus Dodds

In advance of his Monday night lecture in London, Klaus discusses how and where the Arctic is changing and why it matters to those who call it home and those who don’t.

Fur seals, whales, candles and soap - Brian Anderson

Stunning images show what a difference the last 50 years of international protection has had on species in the South Atlantic.

Iditarod trail: The last great race on Earth - Max Hall

The Iditarod Trail sled dog race is a legendary journey of epic proportions across the frozen wastelands of the Alaskan wilderness. It includes 1,160 miles of snowy wilderness, crossing mountain ranges and sea ice. In this talk, Max Hall will show slides of the epic journey and discuss his unforgettable experiences on the trail. 

Southampton: gateway to the world - Andy Skinner

For well over 2,000 years, Southampton has played host to soldiers, travellers, merchants and emigrants. Join Andy from SeaCity Museum for a whistle-stop discovery of this remarkable history and the stories of people who called it home.

Building bridges from the Foyle to Ojague: Philip Donald

Philip will describe his experiences and the challenges involved in building the Foyle bridge and bridges for villages in West Africa.

Lost worlds - Andrew Hayden

A further selection of short films from Andrew's historic collection, including an 1932 expedition from Mexico to Borneo.

 

Human cognition: developments in navigation - Jeremy Morley and Professor Kate Jeffery

Recent neuroscience research has explored how the brain represents details of places and navigation - but how is that linked to how we navigate in the real world?

Sea level change and global warming – Professor Roland Gehrels

Professor Roland Gehrels, from the University of York, will speak on sea level change and global warming, asking which lessons from the past can inform the future.

The landscapes of Jane Austen - Dr Alan Crosby

Jane Austen lived at a time when fashions in landscape design were in the process of change. This talk considers landscape design in the late Georgian and Regency periods, in the context of those wonderful masterpieces of literature.