Sarah examines power, politics and offshore renminbi market making in London.

Emma is the first person to run across Africa from Henties Bay, Namibia to Pemba, Mozambique. In this talk, she shares the lessons learned on this and other adventures.

Professor Joanna Haigh will outline the scientific evidence for a human influence on climate and discuss pathways to limit the rate of global warming and its disastrous impacts.

Back in 1890, trailblazer Nellie Bly circled the globe faster than anyone ever had - in 72 days. 125 years later, Rosemary followed in her global footsteps and has now written Nellie's biography.

Hear from Quintin Lake about his photographic project The Perimeter, and see some of the amazing images that he captured around the coast of Britain on a journey where "each footstep leads to different surprises, beauty and strangeness".

Archives and collections assembled as part of colonial projects are troubling presences in our cultural and scientific institutions. 

Explore beneath the muddy waters of Mozambique to discover the forces that cause floods, and see how global flood forecasting is helping people cheat fate and choose their own destiny.

In this talk, Michael Poland will discuss some of this science, as well as the hits and misses of science communication efforts regarding Yellowstone's volcanic character.

Photographer Kiliii Yüyan illuminates stories of the Arctic and human communities connected to the land. Informed by ancestry that is both Nanai/Hèzhé (East Asian Indigenous) and Chinese-American, he explores the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives.

Paul Clements delves into the Shannon heartland on a foot-stepping quest to recreate the trip of Richard Hayward 80 years earlier.

There are over 250 lost or ruined churches and religious building remains in Norfolk. Illustrating these with his sublime photographs, Clive gives us a tour of these wonderful structures.

Sue Watt takes us on a journey across the continent’s sub Saharan regions to show how vital sustainable tourism can be for the people and wildlife of these countries.

Our panel will take you around the globe to witness some of the most extreme natural hazards.

A panel featuring contributors to the Geography Directions blog discussing latest geographical research on the economic impacts of COVID-19, with a particular focus on food supply.

Hear Chris explain the meaning behind mask rituals and why humans have worn masks since the dawn of civilization.

This talk presents findings from the ASSIST research project. Starting from a geological perspective and issues of spatial proximity and sense place, the project also incorporates insights and methods from psychology and computer science.

Join our panel as we discuss the ethics of wildlife encounters.

Hear Hilary and Janice tell us about their visit to Socotra, with its pink rocks, chubby desert roses and dragon’s blood trees like giant mushrooms.

A look at the developments in 3D visualisation of geodata and the interactions between the geospatial and simulation communities that are driving new technological developments in this area. 

Professor Larner challenges accounts of the ‘neoliberal university’ by discussing the growing recognition that research excellence takes multiple forms.

The Norfolk Broads are made up of over 150 miles of navigable waterways.

Join Bjørn Heyerdahl, the grandson of Thor, as he recounts his expedition around South Africa's Cape of Storms in a traditional wooden Viking boat with a team of world class explorers.

British explorer Bertram Thomas became the first person to cross the largest sand desert on Earth. Hear how Mark and his Omani companions retraced Thomas’s footsteps on their own 49 day journey from Salalah to Doha.

Emma will discuss her expedition journey from Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, across the Davis Strait to Resolute, Nunavut. 

From vast deserts and deep oceans to dinosaur-filled swamps, the Jurassic Coast is one of the world's greatest geological wonders.

Discover how bears and people coexist in the Interandean dry forests of Bolivia through the themes of changing attitudes and perceptions, increasing tolerances, and finding economic alternatives to livestock.

In this talk hear leading cartographer with the British Antarctic Survey explain the development of his latest map series that unfold new stories of Antarctica.

Explore the exquisite balance of nature in the Yukon Territory, including the waxing and waning of the iconic lynx, snowshoe hare, and abalone fishers.

This lecture introduces the life of travel writer and photographer Eric Newby and the times in which he lived, following the recent donation of his archives to the Society.

To discover more of the story of its independence, Olie Hunter Smart takes on an immense challenge to walk the length of India - a 4,500km journey over seven months seeking out untold stories of India's independence and partition.

Hear how Michael and his team overcame the difficulties to make a documentary series in one of the least visited countries in the world.

Get your snorkel gear at the ready and come on an adventure into the North Atlantic Ocean!

Learn about what we can all do to help save the sea no matter where we live.

The focus is Robert Falcon Scott's Terra Nova expedition which relied so heavily on the support of the Society.

Kate is passionate about outreach and engagement and is an advocate of zero-emission living - even at the poles. 

In 1874, John Forrest led an expedition on a 2,700 mile crossing of Australia’s Western Desert.

DEFRA’s Chief Scientific Adviser explains how this can be done.

we delve into this masterpiece of nature writing where Nan Shepherd describes her journeys into the Cairngorm mountains of Scotland. 

We discuss the risks to the UK of a world that’s three degrees warmer, as well as how we can adapt in response.

Kristine speaks of her personal experience working in Chile and Argentina to restore damaged ecosystems and bring back native species, and the moral imperative we all have to stand up for nature.

Talks and discussion to inspire and inform your own projects.

We explore how a brief UV-B burst, during a climatic warming interval, collapsed the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary terrestrial ecosystem.

Climate change is a geopolitical problem, impacting all countries and requiring global action.

RGS-IBG 2019 Award Recipients Antonia Bolingbroke-Kent and Redzi Bernard discuss their travels in India, Myanmar and Ethiopia.

In this audio-only event, Jacki Hill-Murphy is interviewed by Penny Tranter about her forthcoming book ‘The Life and Travels of Isabella Bird’.

A look at the background to the British attempts to climb Mount Everest in the 1920s and at the expeditions of 1921, 1922 and 1924. Illustrated by archives, artefacts and photographs from the Collections of the Society.

Learn more about Antarctica’s unique geopolitical situation, current research being conducted, as well as an insight into the future of this continent.

Retail geography in Britain has changed constantly throughout history, but the triple impacts of the internet, Covid-19 and Brexit threaten unprecedented change, possibly irreversible.

At a time when independent travel seems like a distant memory, Rajesh reflects upon the glory of slow travel and how it will adapt in the future.

Join our panel of travel vloggers and videographers to learn how to create great travel videos.

In this lecture Nigel challenges us to set aside our normal assumptions and take off our NHS spectacles to see the world differently and take control of our health.

Simon Leatherdale tells us why the coastal woods of the UK are under appreciated on a national level, as they represent a unique natural habitat where beach meets bough.

The more we learn about fungi, the less makes sense without them. Join us for a panel discussion on the book and the themes it raises. 

Food security and sustainability in post-conflict Freetown - Professor Tony Binns

Drawing on four decades of research in West Africa, Tony Binns explores the crucial role of urban agriculture in post-conflict Sierra Leone.

Two of our most recent medalists will discuss the progress of development in the Asian countryside and the threats to rural livelihoods in Peru post-Covid-19.

Coastal marine ecosystems are not only beautiful, but also reduce impacts from climate change, enhance coastal wildlife, fisheries and local economies.

This event combines a short film, a virtual exhibition tour and a Q&A to launch ‘Sense of Here’.

This lecture focuses on these dynamics in Cambodia, examining how classical dance has been mobilised to rebuild the Cambodian nation after the Khmer Rouge genocide (1975-1979).

In this short presentation, Jacki Hill-Murphy speaks to Penny Tranter about all things weather. 

Andy highlights the importance of geography and integration of new forms of dynamic spatial data in understanding disease spread, designing elimination strategies and planning for the next pandemic. 

Developing Slow Ways: a network of walking routes that connects Great Britain's towns and cities. How can we all contribute?

Having retraced Shackleton’s 1916 survival journey, Tim explains how South Georgia’s glacial melt over the past 100 years has confirmed the importance of Shackletonian leadership in tackling climate change.

Rewilding is believed to be our hope for the future, breathing life into our landscapes and rural communities. 

In this interview, Dr Bharat Pankhania talks about the coronvairus pandemic, giving a fascinating and chilling insight into its future impact on society. 

A fantastic opportunity to hear from number one best-selling author, Alice Morrison, so close to finishing her latest expedition across the Sahara.

Seaside pleasure piers are unique heritage assets and flagship tourism attractions at Britain’s coastal resorts, but piers are increasingly under threat. 

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Kielder.

World-renowned climber and alpinist, Leo has led major expeditions and hard first ascents on every continent from El Capitan to Everest and from the Amazon to Antarctica. He has produced multiple award winning films of these expeditions taking modern action sports to the most remote corners of Earth.

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Fort William. Locks, lochs, glens and Bens - this virtual walk has it all.

Luke Turner talks about his book Out of the Woods, a critically acclaimed work of memoir and nature writing. 

What makes a successful rural community? How can community be developed? How can success be measured?

Take a virtual journey with photographer Beth Wald into the remote and harshly beautiful Wakhan Corridor of northeast Afghanistan.

Paul Rose takes us on an expedition across the world from your own home. 

Humanity’s tenure on Earth has had very far-reaching consequences. Joe charts the past, present and future of environmental ideas and actions to help find a way through these difficult times.

A guided virtual walk full of fascinating context and history, led by Dick Bateman.

We live in a world shaped by food: a ‘sitopia' (from Gk. sitos, food + topos, place), yet, as Covid-19 reminds us, our failure to recognise this threatens us and our planet. Yet by learning to value food once again, we can not only address the multiple threats we face, but can build better, fairer, more resilient lives for the future.

Paul reflects on life with over 50 neighbours over six years, where residents tackle the climate and now the current COVID-19 crises through living in an affordable, co-operative home ownership community made from straw and wood.

Greenland and Antarctica are distant, unfamiliar places. We hear of giant icebergs breaking away, glaciers crumbling: but how much we do know about the fate of these great ice sheets?

‘The lines, which are so very fine’: John Harrison, William Hogarth and the trouble with drawing a line of Longitude. Katy considers how a clockmaker and an engraver played their parts in how the longitude problem was solved on paper, in London, before it could ever be resolved at sea.

Having successfully crewed the first British sailing boat to sail around the North East/North West passages in one season, David gives us his personal account of this exciting journey and the consequences of this venture.

Our expert panel look at food security and the potential role of new technology, as well as how we can be more mindful of seasonality, production processes, consumption and waste.

Peter explores how the strategic location of Singapore has historically made it a contested space and what role the island and its settlements have played across the centuries.

The Director of the world’s largest migration research project argues that inequality should be central to our thinking about migration and how inequality is an important analytical tool for understanding migration processes and outcomes.

Photographer Guillaume Bonn and curator Rozemin Keshvani discuss Bonn's photo essay on East Africa's disappearing past, barely recognisable but through the echoes of architectural ruins and fragile landscapes.

Isabella tells the story of a daring rewilding experiment at Knepp Estate in West Sussex, showing how a wilder countryside can benefit farming, nature and us.

Hear a panel of some of the UK's most highly respected travel journalists share their hints and tips on how to capture and record your journeys in writing, as well as their experiences on assignment.

How many people can the Earth support? Christopher encourages us to think geographically about the Earth’s carrying capacity whilst considering the perils faced by our planet and our species, and how to survive them.

The age of the smart mobile machine is upon us. Paul explores the intersection between artificial intelligence, robots and their environments, and implications for our country and our planet.

Research on microplastics has largely focused on the oceans, but what is the contribution from our rivers? Jamie will explore microplastic contamination in UK river basins and the role of floods in microplastic transport.

Between 2015 - 2019, award winning photographer Marissa Roth made seven transatlantic crossings on the Queen Mary II, resulting in a poetic photographic study of what it means to cross an ocean.

Marking 200 years since the discovery of land in Antarctica Professor David Vaughan, Jane Rumble OBE, Camilla Nichol and Professor Klaus Dodds will consider Antarctica’s history and its unique status as a continent reserved for peace and science.

No man’s lands are proliferating in today's turbulent world. Using digital archives and immersive technology, Alasdair, Noam and Elliot explore the stories of places that remain locked behind barbed wire and minefields.

"Everything happens somewhere" will be brought to life in this illustrated conversation demonstrating the power of geography to save and transform lives, working through such charities as MapAction and Addressing the Unaddressed.

International broadcaster Zeinab Badawi and Nick Westcott of the Royal African Society explore how we need to look in unexpected places to discover Africa's contemporary reality.

Our panel examines alternative visions of urban futures, covering planning, sustainability, governance and new technology, they give a sense of how everyday city life is being reimagined by geographers.

The Nekton team reveal the discoveries from ‘First Descent: Seychelles’ in their bid to help conserve 30% of the Seychelles' vast ocean territory.

Adam Weymouth tells the story of canoeing 2,000 miles down the Yukon River, investigating how the king salmon's decline is impacting on the many communities and ecosystems that depend on it for survival.

The ubiquitous use of mobile devices means that citizens can gather information like never before. But can what they contribute be geographically valuable? 

Hanifa and Marina share Hanifa's journey to become the first Afghan woman to summit Mt Noshaq (24,580').

The Brazilian Villas Boas brothers, RGS gold-medallists for remarkable explorations, used their fame to champion indigenous peoples, change attitudes to them, and protect their rainforests.

Our panel of experts discuss the various approaches you can take to reduce the impacts of your holidays on the planet and answer the question: what does it mean to travel well?

RGS-IBG grant recipients, Katie and Karen recount their separate journeys along two rivers; the Murray and the Naryn. Whilst challenging themselves, they discovered the difficulties faced by the people who rely on rivers for their livelihoods.

Feeding a growing population from finite resources is one of the major challenges of the 21st century. Peter explores how we can achieve more sustainable and healthy systems of food production and consumption.

Andy Miller, a heritage consultant specialising in post-conflict environments, gives an overview of ongoing restoration projects in the Old City of Mosul in the aftermath of its occupation by ISIS.

After 25 years in the business, Kate explores how geographers are influencing the digital media industries - using their knowledge of cartography, cultural systems and environmental challenges, to build engaging digital worlds.

In 1969 four men successfully completed the first surface crossing of the Arctic Ocean, led by Sir Wally Herbert. On the 50th anniversary of this exceptional achievement, Kari tells their story.

The Arctic is changing. But how and where is it changing, and why does it matter to those who call it home and those who don't?

Victor tells the story of the sacred river and explains how the fate of the world's most important waterway has lessons for all the great rivers of our planet.

On this beautiful orb, we have reached the point in our collective journey where geographical knowledge is the best guarantor of our future. Nicholas Crane makes the case for the great age of geography.

Maps can be beautiful, iconic and influential. Hugh draws on the Society's unparalleled collection to show how they have lured travellers to places from the 1600s to the present day.

Do you know where your clothes have come from? The conditions under which they have been made? And who made them?

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope.

Sir Michael Palin will retrace the history of HMS Erebus and her crew; from the part it played in Ross' Antarctic expedition of 1839-43, to its abandonment during Franklin's ill-fated Arctic expedition.

William recounts his experiences of some of the world's driest places, from the borderlands of the USA to the sacred deserts of Egypt's Desert Fathers.

Through sharing his experiences of chasing wildfires accross four continents, Thomas will explore the science of 'pyrogeography' and what it can tell us about the drivers and impacts of environmental change.

Miranda explores how powerful information about location can be used to build a system of smarter infrastructure to help the UK economy and society to thrive.

Sara returns to the thin country to mark the 25th anniversary of her bestselling book recounting a six-month journey from the Peruvian border to Chilean Antarctica.

At a moment when global cooperation is under threat, this lecture examines the history of internationalism, with particular reference to the international role of RGS-IBG.

Three years since Paris: is there still time to save the world?

Award-winning photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher have recorded African sacred ceremonies for the past 40 years. In words and images, they will share their experiences behind the making of their new magnum opus, African Twilight.

Linden considers whether the Sustainable Development Goals offer a realistic roadmap for the future of our planet. Are they a unifying call or a random wish list?

Fiona reflects on why beauty matters, yet barely features in public debate and policy. She will argue that beauty is needed to moderate the increasingly commercial, economistic narrative that prevails today.

Paul will examine developments in flood risk modelling, which has long been dominated by engineers and mathematicians, and show how Geographers and their technologies have challenged and disrupted traditional approaches to understanding floods.

A career of professional diving in the world's wildest, remote, challenging and pristine places gives Paul a unique perspective of our seas. Can we be more optimistic about the future health of our Oceans?

This illustrated lecture explores beauty and ruin in the old caravansary towns of the Thar Desert in Shekhawati, and highlights conservation efforts aimed at preserving the region’s fading visual culture.

A team of novice polar explorers from across Europe and the Middle East ski across the rapidly dwindling sea ice of the Arctic Ocean in this tale of faith, hope and cultural insight.

Deborah explores how 1886 RGS Instructor in Photography, John Thompson, applied images to the science of geography, to guide and influence a new generation of travellers.

After a decade of work in West Papua, BBC presenter and journalist Will Millard was diagnosed with PTSD. This talk details both his work and trauma, and describes how a love for water has helped him recover.

Migrants on the margins is the Society's collaborative field research project, focusing on the vulnerability and opportunities of migrants in some of the world’s most pressured cities. Members of the research team outline some of their findings so far.

Leon takes us on a 1,000-mile walk from Jerusalem to Mount Sinai, exploring the culture, history and faith in one of the most complex and compelling places on earth.

Charlie talks about efforts to save Timbuktu's precious manuscripts from al-Qaeda in 2012-13, and examines the powerful myths that drew early European explorers there.

An illustrated talk that weaves together stories of the people, the landscapes and the issues facing Mongolia. Karina draws on her 16 years' experience of exploring and working in Mongolia.

In her last lecture as Director, Rita draws on her physical geography background and experience of leading the Society to explore the place of the discipline in a rapidly changing world at home and abroad.

Rod Downie shares his experience in developing innovative solutions to better understand and conserve polar bears in the rapidly changing Arctic.

Markus tackles the challenges posed by one of the world's most written about and most misunderstood countries – from nuclear threat, to refugees and the media frenzy.

The remarkable growth of Chinese cities in the last 30 years is the biggest, and possibly most rapid, process of urbanisation the world has ever seen. It has transformed China, its environment and people.

In 2014 Ben led the longest ever polar journey on foot, completing the South Pole return that defeated Scott and Shackleton. In 2017 he attempted the first solo, unsupported and unassisted crossing of Antarctica.

Levison talks about his latest expeditions, his early travels and his motivation. In considering the age old question of why people explore, he explains what draws him to the wilderness.

Devastating hurricanes, forest fires, flash floods. Vulnerable communities across the world have succumbed to all of these and more in recent months. Increasingly they are asking the question, "Is this linked to climate change?"

High street regeneration: place-making and changing spaces - Dr Steve Millington

Declining retail poses fundamental questions to the future of places where we live, work and socialise. How have these places been managed so far - and how can geographers envisage brighter futures for their development?

Dr Barbara Bond investigates MI9’s wartime escape and evasion mapping programme including how maps were smuggled to prisoners and how they helped orchestrate some of the most famous escapes in history.

With basic geographic data lacking in many low income countries, Andy explores how cell phone and satellite technologies offer new ways to help achieve and monitor the Sustainable Development Goals.

Patrick talks about his journey from sizeable small islands to ever tinier islets in search of the special quality of island life. Do small islands have big lessons for us on the mainland?

Straightforward honesty is rarely the default setting for political and business communication; Evan looks at the effect this has on the conduct of business and politics generally, and on the rise of populism in particular.

A vibrant portrait of the “original affluent society”--the Bushmen of southern Africa--by the anthropologist who has spent much of the last twenty-five years documenting their encounter with modernity.

Each year more than 300,000 people are reported as missing in the UK. Hester considers where missing people go, their experiences, and the complexities of what happens after they return.

Professor Matthew Goodwin examines the drivers of the vote for Brexit, what it tells us about public opinion and party politics in Britain and what might happen next.

BAFTA award winner Bruce talks about his four-year journey among indigenous peoples across the world – from Borneo to India and the Amazon - exploring their wisdom and inner feeling of connections to nature.

Introducing the Society's newly digitised film collection, and a deeper look at R.A. Bagnold's 1932 expedition – the first east-west crossing of the Libyan Desert as captured on film.

Kevin talks about the issue of slavery in the 21st century, focusing not only on human rights violations, but the link between slavery, environmental destruction and climate change.

David and Adrian examine contemporary changes in these fascinating and enormous features, drawing on the latest evidence from the Larsen Ice Shelf, and exploring both the causes and implications of ice shelf decay.

Frank discusses the nature of and trends in London's air quality in recent years, the impact of air quality on health and how public understanding of the issue is changing.

Kerstin talks of her project to understand more about, and to protect, these extraordinary and beautiful marine creatures off the coast of Peru; working with local communities and supported by a Rolex Award for Enterprise.

Anthony follows young T.E. Lawrence on the series of extraordinary journeys across Europe and the Middle East that transformed him from the bright but troubled second son of an Oxford-based family into Lawrence of Arabia.

Jenny discovered the remarkable illustrated journals of Thomas Machell in the British Library. She will interweave their adventures as she seeks this forgotten explorer in India's Raj, the South China Sea, Polynesia and Arabia.

To outsiders, Sri Lanka's civil war (1983-2009) remains perplexing. Award-winning author John describes a journey that begins with Tooting's 8,000 refugees, and ends on the battlefields of Mullaitivu. There's horror here, beauty and hope.

Space and time on Earth are regulated by the prime (Greenwich) meridian, 0'. Before the 1880s more than 25 prime meridians were in use, resulting in problems of global measurement that engaged geographers, astronomers and navigators.

Over three decades, tiger populations in the Western Ghats have recovered to be the largest in the world. Ullas explains the tiger conservation strategy, blending science with social interventions.

The Aztec city Tenochtitlán was the largest and best-run on Earth. In Mexico John discovered that Hernán Cortés conquered not by guns and horses, but language, diplomacy, obsidian and a little steel.

James Raffan circumnavigated the Arctic Circle to put a human face on climate change. His rare and insightful story touches the Earth's last wild places revealing the breadth of human adaptation and ingenuity.

Seeking adventure and stories to inspire young people, Sarah set out from London in 2011 to circle the northern hemisphere – travelling 25,000 miles – using a rowing boat, a bike and a kayak.

The most distinguished foreign correspondent of our time talks through a fascinating history of what it is to risk life and limb to bring home news of the troubled world beyond our shores.

Rory recounts the journey with his father through the mountains and valleys, across Hadrian's Wall and housing estates to uncover the "forgotten land" where England meets Scotland, re-evaluating history, geography and life as they go.

This talk explores what the future holds for satellite applications and the opportunities it presents to improve lives everywhere - a new role for space technology in the 21st century.

From shadowy mangroves to the deep oceans, Helen will chart the course of seashells through history. She will explore their use as currency to their impact on modern-day technologies.

In January 2016 the Coxless Crew completed their double world record-setting Pacific Ocean row. The crew will talk about the challenges they faced and share their experiences of this epic journey.

The UK Overseas Territories include vast wilderness areas across three oceans. Mark will explore these, describing transformative approaches to conservation being tested in the British Indian Ocean Territory and elsewhere.

Each region of the world faces different population challenges – reducing fertility, employing a ‘bulge’ of young people or managing ageing populations. Sarah explores these and the global implications for the future.

David will explore the future prospects of younger people, and the state, looking at the long-term demographic, economic and political drivers of differences between the generations – one of the key issues of our time.

Drawing on a lifetime exploring British landscapes, Nicholas will describe how we have modified our habitat since the tundra thawed 12,000 years ago and why we should value our island story.

There's too much plastic in our oceans, much of it as microscopic particles. Where does it come from? Where does it do most harm? And what can we do about it?

Featuring some beautiful imagery, Melanie takes us on a scientific journey into Arctic lands to learn about the spectacular aurora.

Geography is the discipline of our future. Humanity has become a geological superpower. Acknowledging and embracing this new idea will allow us to protect Earth's environment and its peoples.

Tristan explores how to spot the clues, signs and patterns in water; from puddles to lakes and from streams to oceans, using examples from across the world.

This illustrated assessment of Britain's impact on the world marks the 400th anniversary of the death of Richard Hakluyt, one of the UK's most influential early geographers and a historian of exploration.

An ancient eternal fuel, the highest snow passes on Earth, and the last of the great Himalayan muleteers – told by the only known westerner to travel the entire Tea Horse Road by foot.

Bob explores the significance of the archaeology in the Middle East and North Africa, the current threats and pressures it faces, and the work to document and preserve sites at risk.

The former British High Commissioner to Australia and Singapore explores the many ways in which geography features in the working of modern diplomacy, illustrated with personal experiences from postings overseas and at the FCO in London.

Alexander von Humboldt is the great lost scientist. Historian Andrea will talk about how his ideas revolutionised science and why he is the forgotten father of environmentalism.

One of the world’s leading high-altitude climbers shares his personal stories of a lifetime of mountaineering, including the Himalayan Triple Crown in 2013, and what drives him to do it.

Dark, forgotten, golden, hopeless, wild, rising, new… The Director of the Royal African Society examines why every label diminishes Africa.

For 10 years scientists have warned of the potential for a massive earthquake in Nepal. Was the April 2015 earthquake that event or an indicator of a larger disaster to come?