Earth Photo

A shortlist of 50 exceptional photographs and films that document the Earth in all its diversity. Developed jointly by Forestry England and the Society. 

The Lower Mekong: water, Watts and war - Jim Holmes

Jim has spent 30 years documenting humanitarian work worldwide with a focus on the individuals and communities affected. His lecture follows one of the world’s mightiest rivers as it flows through Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and out to sea.

Tall oaks from little acorns grow… - Dr Andrew Hacket-Pain

This talk focuses on recent work on the dynamics of “masting”. This is a fascinating reproductive strategy found in many perennial plants, in which plants switch between years of bumper and lean seed crops, rather than producing seeds and fruits regularly every year.

70 years of National Parks in Britain - John King

The lecture will investigate some of the UK's 15 National Parks, concentrating on the geological background and processes which moulded the landscapes along with the role tourism plays.

One day as a tiger - John Porter

John Porter discusses his revelatory and poignant award-winning memoir of his friend and mountaineer Alex MacIntyre.

Guerilla geographies - Daniel Raven-Ellison

Giving examples of radical, alternative and creative public geographies, Daniel will explain what guerrilla geography is, why it's important and how it's at the heart of the movement he started to make London the world's first National Park City.
 

Annual regional dinner - Professor Joe Smith

Join the North West regional committee to celebrate another successful year for the region.
 

Carbon doesn’t cause climate change, you do - Dr Josh Dean

From the Arctic to the tropics, this lecture will cover research frontiers in carbon cycling and climate change in the natural environment.

50,000 years of land use change and human impact in South East Asia - Professor Chris Hunt

Most people think that tropical forests were virtually unaffected by human activity until recent times, but they were actually the first humanly impacted environments on Earth.

Digital geographies - Professor Mark Graham

Far from being a space de-tethered from the material world, the Internet has a real-world geography. Mark explores why digital geographies matter, and how we can build more equitable digital futures.

A guided walk of Spike Island

A tour focused on the changes in the local landscape and environment of Spike Island.


 

New to teaching in Geography, Earth and Environmental Science

A one day workshop for postgraduate students and other non-permanent academic staff / associates who are involved in teaching and supporting student learning specifically in the Geography, Earth and Environmental Science (GEES) disciplines. 

The Flipflopi expedition and the plastic revolution - Ben Morrison

A talk about a boat, brightly coloured and made entirely out of plastic, collected from Kenyan beaches, taking the message of a plastic revolution from Africa to the rest of the world.
 

A land-sea expedition to the remote fjords of Chile - Dr Rachel Smedley

Join Dr Rachel Smedley as she talks about this 2-week land-sea expedition around the remote fjords of South West Chile.

 

Trees from around the world - Professor David Skydmore and Rhoderic Taylor

This fascinating arboretum, created by Sir Bernard Lovell FRS, comprises trees from around the world including two national collections. The tour will describe its history and significance to biogeography.
 

Clough Head and Wainwright - Tim Foster

An ascent and circuit of Clough Head with reference to Alfred Wainwright.

Africa's forgotten frontiers: the Sahel - Reza Pakravan

Taking the audience on a breathtaking journey across the continent, filmmaker Reza Pakravan will share stories of the tense frontiers, enduring traditions and ordinary people living where climate change has hit hardest: the Sahel.