The Lower Mekong: water, Watts and war - Jim Holmes

Jim has spent 30 years documenting humanitarian work worldwide with a focus on the individuals and communities affected. His lecture follows one of the world’s mightiest rivers as it flows through Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, Vietnam and out to sea.

The two Sudans - Christopher Peskett

Chris will describe the important work of Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in both Sudan and South Sudan and the link between landscape, climate, tribal politics, religion and health.

Dealing with disease: evaluating responses in the developing world - Dr Gill Miller

This talk explores the challenges facing global and local stakeholders in dealing with disease in the developing world. 

The secrets of Vulcan: the hidden world of underwater volcanoes - Chris Macleod

Part of the School of Ocean and Environmental Sciences series on Volcanoes—all you need to know! More details to be announced here nearer the event. 

Tall oaks from little acorns grow… - Dr Andrew Hacket-Pain

This talk focuses on recent work on the dynamics of “masting”. This is a fascinating reproductive strategy found in many perennial plants, in which plants switch between years of bumper and lean seed crops, rather than producing seeds and fruits regularly every year.

Christmas Social

Christmas Social with a lovely four course meal which will include four mini talks about the speakers' favourite place after each course.

70 years of National Parks in Britain - John King

The lecture will investigate some of the UK's 15 National Parks, concentrating on the geological background and processes which moulded the landscapes along with the role tourism plays.

Our Planet: in the hands of young people - Matt Larsen-Daw

Drawing on the WWF/Netflix Our Planet Series, Matt Larsen-Daw considers what we can all do as we navigate the path ahead.

Africa's forgotten frontiers: the Sahel - Reza Pakravan

Taking the audience on a breathtaking journey across the continent, filmmaker Reza Pakravan will share stories of the tense frontiers, enduring traditions and ordinary people living where climate change has hit hardest: the Sahel.

Africa's forgotten frontiers: the Sahel - Reza Pakravan

Taking the audience on a breathtaking journey across the continent, filmmaker Reza Pakravan will share stories of the tense frontiers, enduring traditions and ordinary people living where climate change has hit hardest: the Sahel. 

Whither the wetlands? The world’s wet places and future climate change

Join staff and students, along with the South West regional committee, for this public event celebrating 50 years of geography as a degree subject at the University of Plymouth.

One day as a tiger - John Porter

John Porter discusses his revelatory and poignant award-winning memoir of his friend and mountaineer Alex MacIntyre.

Veolia energy recovery facility field visit

A walking tour of Veolia’s state-of-the-art recycling and energy recovery facility. 

Rivers - Chaz Powell

Chaz discusses the beginning of his wildest journey and the mission to walk Africa's rivers in the battle against wildlife crime.

Photo credit: Charles Powell

Africa's forgotten frontiers: the Sahel - Reza Pakravan

Taking the audience on a breathtaking journey across the continent, filmmaker Reza Pakravan will share stories of the tense frontiers, enduring traditions and ordinary people living where climate change has hit hardest: the Sahel. 

Ponds and carbon: is small beautiful or dangerous? Dr Mike Jeffries

This talk will explore the possibilities and perils of how ponds fit in the carbon cycle.

Africa's forgotten frontiers: the Sahel - Reza Pakravan

Taking the audience on a breathtaking journey across the continent, filmmaker Reza Pakravan will share stories of the tense frontiers, enduring traditions and ordinary people living where climate change has hit hardest: the Sahel.

On the road with 'the Watches' - Gillian Burke

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope.

On the road with 'the Watches' - Gillian Burke

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope. 

The historical background to Boko Haram - John Hare OBE

John's talk will place the current conflict in northern Nigeria in its historical context.  

Guerilla geographies - Daniel Raven-Ellison

Giving examples of radical, alternative and creative public geographies, Daniel will explain what guerrilla geography is, why it's important and how it's at the heart of the movement he started to make London the world's first National Park City.
 

Building a volcano - Jon Blundy

Part of the School of Ocean and Environmental Sciences' series on Volcanoes—all you need to know! More details to be announced here nearer the event. 

How we damage nature and what we might do about it - Professor Andrew Church

This lecture will consider what we all might do to limit the damaging impacts of human society on nature. 

Annual regional dinner - Professor Joe Smith

Join the North West regional committee to celebrate another successful year for the region.
 

The moral geography of the Arctic - Dr Anthony Speca

This talk will uncover the moral dimensions of the Arctic and challenge us to think afresh about this fascinating part of the world.

The Start Bay problem - Dr Richard Porter

A case study of coastal erosion and deposition and its impact on the human environment in and around Start Bay.

Carbon doesn’t cause climate change, you do - Dr Josh Dean

From the Arctic to the tropics, this lecture will cover research frontiers in carbon cycling and climate change in the natural environment.

The future of the Mendip Hills AONB - Jim Hardcastle

The talk will be an insight into the good, the bad and the alarming future of this very special protected landscape. 

MapAction: geographic support for humanitarian decision making - Roy Wood

This talk describes how MapAction deploys rapid response geographic support to natural disasters and other humanitarian situations.

50,000 years of land use change and human impact in South East Asia - Professor Chris Hunt

Most people think that tropical forests were virtually unaffected by human activity until recent times, but they were actually the first humanly impacted environments on Earth.

Geographic information and sustainability - Professor Andy Tatem

With basic geographic data lacking in many low income countries, Andy explores how cell phone and satellite technologies offer new ways to help achieve and monitor the Sustainable Development Goals.

Geographic information and sustainability - Professor Andy Tatem

With basic geographic data lacking in many low income countries, Andy explores how cell phone and satellite technologies offer new ways to help achieve and monitor the Sustainable Development Goals.

Selling the Earth: communicating contested geoscience - Professor Iain Stewart

Professor Iain Stewart will share his expansive experience in geo-communication activities, developed whilst working with BBC Science.

Travels in Africa and Asia - Eric Woods

Eric’s illustrated talk will draw on his considerable experience of travel for work and pleasure in some of the most intriguing and interesting countries.
 

Mapping escapes during World War II - Barbara Bond

Barbara investigates MI9’s wartime escape and evasion mapping programme, including how maps were smuggled to prisoners and how they helped orchestrate some of the most famous escapes in history.
 

The Sargasso Sea: a suitable case for conservation? - Professor Howard Roe

The ecology and threats faced by the Sargasso Sea are discussed in this talk, together with ongoing conservation efforts.

Digital geographies - Professor Mark Graham

Far from being a space de-tethered from the material world, the Internet has a real-world geography. Mark explores why digital geographies matter, and how we can build more equitable digital futures.

Mapping escapes during World War II - Barbara Bond

Barbara investigates MI9’s wartime escape and evasion mapping programme, including how maps were smuggled to prisoners and how they helped orchestrate some of the most famous escapes in history.

Evolution and mass extinction - Professor Mike Bowman

Mike will discuss the history of life, exploring fossils and what they can tell us about geological time and ancient environments.

Darkness on the edge of town: the story of Liverpool’s Albert Dock - John Flamson OBE

It is 35 years since the first phase of the refurbishment of the Grade 1 listed Albert Dock complex was completed and this once private, derelict dockland was opened to the public.

Slovenia: a connection with the outdoors - Richard Matthews

Hear about Richard's trek along the Slovenia Mountain Trail. A 600km trail capturing more than just mountains and scenery, but a place of understanding.