Emma is the first person to run across Africa from Henties Bay, Namibia to Pemba, Mozambique. In this talk, she shares the lessons learned on this and other adventures.

Back in 1890, trailblazer Nellie Bly circled the globe faster than anyone ever had - in 72 days. 125 years later, Rosemary followed in her global footsteps and has now written Nellie's biography.

Hear from Quintin Lake about his photographic project The Perimeter, and see some of the amazing images that he captured around the coast of Britain on a journey where "each footstep leads to different surprises, beauty and strangeness".

The state of nature – and why should we even care? - Dr Mark Wright

In this Covid-19 world there has been a renewed interest in looking at our relationship with nature. This talk will explore what is the real state of nature and what underpins the significant changes we are seeing.

Photographer Kiliii Yüyan illuminates stories of the Arctic and human communities connected to the land. Informed by ancestry that is both Nanai/Hèzhé (East Asian Indigenous) and Chinese-American, he explores the human relationship to the natural world from different cultural perspectives.

Project UKFall: Retrieving meteorites and why it's important - Dr Luke Daly

This talk will give you an opportunity to discover how projects like UKFall are tracking fireballs to recover meteorites, providing new insights into our solar system's history.

Paul Clements delves into the Shannon heartland on a foot-stepping quest to recreate the trip of Richard Hayward 80 years earlier.

There are over 250 lost or ruined churches and religious building remains in Norfolk. Illustrating these with his sublime photographs, Clive gives us a tour of these wonderful structures.

A panel featuring contributors to the Geography Directions blog discussing latest geographical research on the economic impacts of COVID-19, with a particular focus on food supply.

Earth Photo: in conversation with winning photographers

Each year the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), Forestry England and Parker Harris host the Earth Photo competition, attracting contributions from around the world. This event brings together winning photographers for personal presentations and a panel discussion.

This talk presents findings from the ASSIST research project. Starting from a geological perspective and issues of spatial proximity and sense place, the project also incorporates insights and methods from psychology and computer science.

A look at the developments in 3D visualisation of geodata and the interactions between the geospatial and simulation communities that are driving new technological developments in this area. 

The Norfolk Broads are made up of over 150 miles of navigable waterways.

Join Bjørn Heyerdahl, the grandson of Thor, as he recounts his expedition around South Africa's Cape of Storms in a traditional wooden Viking boat with a team of world class explorers.

Emma will discuss her expedition journey from Kangerlussuaq, Greenland, across the Davis Strait to Resolute, Nunavut. 

Two Frogs - Andy Dickson

Andy Dickson is a triathlete with a passion for the Lake District, the UK’s most visited national park. In 2020 he set himself the challenge of tackling two iconic ultra-endurance journeys - the Frog Graham and Frog Whitton - through the mountains, valleys and lakes of this celebrated landscape, becoming the first person ever to complete both.

Discover how bears and people coexist in the Interandean dry forests of Bolivia through the themes of changing attitudes and perceptions, increasing tolerances, and finding economic alternatives to livestock.

Explore the exquisite balance of nature in the Yukon Territory, including the waxing and waning of the iconic lynx, snowshoe hare, and abalone fishers.

To discover more of the story of its independence, Olie Hunter Smart takes on an immense challenge to walk the length of India - a 4,500km journey over seven months seeking out untold stories of India's independence and partition.

Building relationships to ensure humanitarian delivery of aid - Henry Chamberlain

Ensuring aid safely reaches the right place is a vital job. Henry will give us insight into the obstacles in supplying aid and the strategies used to overcome them.

Revisiting rewilding - John Harold

Rewilding: it’s a popular word and it probably isn’t going away. But what does it really mean?

We explore how a brief UV-B burst, during a climatic warming interval, collapsed the Devonian-Carboniferous boundary terrestrial ecosystem.

In this audio-only event, Jacki Hill-Murphy is interviewed by Penny Tranter about her forthcoming book ‘The Life and Travels of Isabella Bird’.

Retail geography in Britain has changed constantly throughout history, but the triple impacts of the internet, Covid-19 and Brexit threaten unprecedented change, possibly irreversible.

Simon Leatherdale tells us why the coastal woods of the UK are under appreciated on a national level, as they represent a unique natural habitat where beach meets bough.

Food security and sustainability in post-conflict Freetown - Professor Tony Binns

Drawing on four decades of research in West Africa, Tony Binns explores the crucial role of urban agriculture in post-conflict Sierra Leone.

Coastal marine ecosystems are not only beautiful, but also reduce impacts from climate change, enhance coastal wildlife, fisheries and local economies.

This event combines a short film, a virtual exhibition tour and a Q&A to launch ‘Sense of Here’.

In this short presentation, Jacki Hill-Murphy speaks to Penny Tranter about all things weather. 

Developing Slow Ways: a network of walking routes that connects Great Britain's towns and cities. How can we all contribute?

Rewilding is believed to be our hope for the future, breathing life into our landscapes and rural communities. 

In this interview, Dr Bharat Pankhania talks about the coronvairus pandemic, giving a fascinating and chilling insight into its future impact on society. 

Reaching for the Poles: the South Pole - Eugene Rae

From Phipps to Fiennes: a look at some of the explorers who tried to reach the North or South Poles and some who tried to do both.

Reaching for the Poles: the North Pole - Eugene Rae

From Phipps to Fiennes: a look at some of the explorers who tried to reach the North or South Poles and some who tried to do both.

A fantastic opportunity to hear from number one best-selling author, Alice Morrison, so close to finishing her latest expedition across the Sahara.

Seaside pleasure piers are unique heritage assets and flagship tourism attractions at Britain’s coastal resorts, but piers are increasingly under threat. 

Soil science: exciting and needed! - Dr Jenny Jones

Soil is our vital resource yet we tend to overlook it. Most people have contact with soil daily, even if only walking over it, but will rarely consider its value.

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Kielder.

World-renowned climber and alpinist, Leo has led major expeditions and hard first ascents on every continent from El Capitan to Everest and from the Amazon to Antarctica. He has produced multiple award winning films of these expeditions taking modern action sports to the most remote corners of Earth.

Mountain pressure: Snowdonia's cultural landscape at a crossroads - John Harold

Hear Snowdonia’s various pasts and futures as a cultural landscape, as wildland, and as a people's playground.

Join Chris Speight for this virtual walk around Fort William. Locks, lochs, glens and Bens - this virtual walk has it all.

What makes a successful rural community? How can community be developed? How can success be measured?

A tale of two seas - Professor Tom Rippeth

Professor Tom Rippeth explores the interconnectedness of the global oceans with our weather and climate.

A guided virtual walk full of fascinating context and history, led by Dick Bateman.