Internal migration

By 2050, it is projected that 70% of the world's population will live in cities. 5.2 billion urban residents are expected in Asia and Africa. How is internal migration shaping these cities? 

Mapping London

This module will take you on a journey through the way that London, a fascinating city, has been presented and represented over the years

The United Kingdom

The aim of this unit is to develop the essential qualities and skills of young geographers through geographical knowledge and geographical enquiry relating to the physical and human environments of The United Kingdom

Urban public spaces are at their best when they are democratic, inclusive, and meet the needs of a wide range of people

Why do newspapers portray Britain’s teenagers as an endangered species?

Are you eating, sleeping, drinking and teaching the World Cup? How does our consumption of the global game impact us and others around the world?

Geography Professor Allan Brimicombe from the University of East London is leading an impact study on behalf of the London Organising Committee of LOCOG and the IOC

The UNICEF 2015 State of the World’s Children Report celebrates the new forms of appropriate technology that are being tried and tested in parts of world where children are most at risk from poverty and inequality

Geopolitics is defined as the relationship between power and the spaces of the world. At London 2012 there were 204 such spaces – the nations that competed

In a collaboration between the Nicaraguan government and Chinese industry, a new 300km canal is set to be dug linking the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans

Impossible places

This module explores how human activity can create or change places that can be considered to be "impossible"

New India

The purpose of this module is to explore what is often referred to in the media as ‘New India'

The geography of science

The purpose of this module is to explore some of the links between the disciplines of geography and science through three topical flashpoints: swine flu, earthquakes and climate change

Our place in history

This cross-curricular unit links geographical and historical study to enable students to research, understand and develop an affinity with the history of their local area

London 2012 Olympic Park

Written before the London 2012 Olympics, this resource looks at the developments in East London in the lead up to the Games

Who do we think we are?

A cross-curricular unit linking Geography with Citizenship

Changing faces, shaping places

This module focuses on the theme of migration, the permanent or semi-permanent change of a person's place of residence - or simply, the movement of people from one place to another

Geography: The language of Europe

This is a cross-curricular module which introduces aspects of Modern Foreign Languages (MFL) into the geographical study of places and processes in Europe

Mapping festivals

This module develops students' map skills through the contemporary topic of Music Festivals

Who wants to live forever?

This unit of work explores important demographic themes

Africa- a continent of contrasts

The aim of this module is to introduce students to the huge variation in geography that exists within the complex continent of Africa

Paradise Lost

This module is about tourism in contemporary Thailand

London 2012

The build up to the Olympics in 2012 hosted in London provides an excellent hook to engage Key Stage 3 students with many geographical themes on a range of scales

The geography of my stuff

This unit of work focuses upon the interconnections and inter-relationships that link teenage consumers living in the UK with societies and environments overseas, where the goods they purchase are made

The Mediterranean

This module, comprising of six lessons takes a ‘zoom lens’ approach to studying the Mediterranean region within Europe

The United States of America

This module, comprising six lessons, or half a term’s work, will focus on the United States of America

Hong Kong: A city in Asia by the sea

This module, comprising six lessons, or half a term's work, focuses on the city of Hong Kong

Discovering megacities

By 2050 it is expected that 70% of the world population will live in urban areas. Find out more about the areas these people will live in - megacities

2011 UK Census

Prompted by rapid population growth, the UK government ordered the first national census to take place in 1801. The UK census counts the total population and records its characteristics, such as age, gender, employment and health. A census has been carried out every 10 years since 1801, except during wartime in 1941

Cairo, the long standing capital city of Egypt is facing an uncertain future as the country’s primary city. Recent proposals have emerged of a whole new, as yet unnamed, capital city being built in the north of the country

Andhra Pradesh, India is set to get a new state capital; one which planners say will rival some of India’s most industrious and populous cities

Introducing metacities, mega-regions, smart cities, instant cities, technoscapes and other new types of settlement growth

It has been announced that the small market town of Bicester is to be the next new garden city

With economic opportunities gravitating towards urban centres, many rural areas have lost out

In 2012, Docklands finally overtook the City district to become the highest-ranked employment zone for financial services in London

How are migration trends affecting UK population growth and how has the government responded?

The lives of migrants remains a topic of interest for many geographical researchers but few look closely at the new lives that are carved out by those who have been displaced by natural disasters

What is the link between youthful out-migration and Poland’s current pension crisis?

How is migration away from Poland impacting on its music scene and the nation’s economy?

Astana, the new capital in Kazakhstan, represents more than just a new start; for architects and planners it became a means of symbolising the country’s movement away from centralised Soviet control

The Millennium Development Goals were set in 2000 at a United Nations summit. The targets were ambitious, but realistic, and all had a deadline of 2015

The Millennium Development Goals were set in 2000 at a United Nations summit. The targets were ambitious, but realistic, and all had a deadline of 2015

Around 200,000 Britons live in France. A considerable number of these live in rural areas and it is estimated that Britons own 3% of the French countryside (including vineyards, farms and forests)

In the spring of 2016 Tesco launched a line of meat and fresh produce under a series of farm names which replaced their Everyday Value 'basics' range. However the produce was found to come from manufacturers with no relation to the names on the packaging of the final product

Can a trip to the remote wilderness of Antarctica be sustainable? Why is Antarctica such a desirable holiday location and what risks do these ventures bring?

Thirty five million of China’s wealthiest people have stated that they would like to emigrate overseas in the near future and if and when they do, they are likely to bring with them substantial investment into local economies

Is the "north-south" divide intensifying and are local scale inequalities increasing?

Gendered divisions in work and care

Dr Alice Evans is Lecturer in Human Geography at the University of Cambridge and she researches inequality, cities, and social change

Migrants on the Margins

Professor Michael Collyer, a Reader in Geography at the University of Sussex talks to us about Migrants on the Margins

Production networks and trade

Shamel Azmeh is a Fellow at the Department of International Development at London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), a visiting fellow at Brooks World Poverty Institute at the University of Manchester, and an associate lecturer at Lancaster Environment Centre at the University of Lancaster

HIV and AIDS

Dr Ruth Evans, Lecturer in Human Geography, University of Reading

Global cities, gentrification and creative practices

Dr Oli Mould is lecturer at Royal Holloway, University of London. His academic research focuses on urban creativity, activism and politics

Kenya - A changing nation

Kenya has long been renowned for its stunning natural landscapes and its unique animal life

China - Snapshots in Time

China is a country that is rarely out of the headlines, whether for its rapid industrial growth, its politics or more recently the advent of the Beijing Olympics

India - Pictures of the Past

India has long sparked the imagination of many an explorer and adventurer, from the ancient temples and rolling heat soaked plains of the south to the chilling beauty of the Himalaya

Urbanisation and migration

The Sand Diggers of Mali: The impacts of a rapidly growing city

Made in Britain

How can the UK adapt to manufacturing challenges in order to sustain economic growth and resilience?

Equalising education

Equalising education is not just about closing the education and skills gap between developed and developing countries but also about ensuring everyone has the right to a good education

Feeding the 9 billion

We will need 70% more food to be produced to cope with the massive expansion of urban living, the rise of the middle classes, climate change and resource scarcity

Global health in the 21st Century

Can societies strike a balance between combating pandemics, while maintaining the hopes of eradicating established diseases

Adapting to an urban future

In 2009 the 50/50 point was passed and, for the first time in history, more people live in urban than rural areas

Not in my back yard

With pressure on the UK’s ageing energy and transport infrastructures mounting, is it time to put projects of national importance ahead of local concerns?

Digital divide in the UK?

Does the internet's rapid evolution and increasing role in daily life threaten to leave some sections of society behind?

Britain's ageing population

Britain is facing a dramatic shift in its population age structure, caused by both a declining fertility rate and a rising life expectancy rate

Concreting the countryside

The UK has a projected housing shortfall of 3 million homes by 2020 and the crisis is one of supply meeting demand and where to put these new homes

How and why the world’s population will stabilise at nine to 10 billion, and the concepts of ‘developed’ and ‘undeveloped’

London is highly successful as a city and is twenty nine percent more productive than the UK average

Despite comprising over three quarters of Russia land mass, Siberia is home to only forty million people, one of the lowest population densities of any region or country in the world

While for many years it has commonly been seen as the world’s most failed and dangerous state, Somalia is also a country with a strong drive for resurrection throughout the coming years

Afghanistan - Moving stories

Afghanistan has a rich and complex history, a diverse cultural heritage, but has been and continues to be the centre of political, social and economic struggles

Journeys - Caribbean stories

This theme explores the history of the Caribbean in the 1900s through images which illustrate everyday life

Brazil cityscapes - Rio de Janeiro

What images do you have of Brazil? Carnival, football and coffee? Did you know that Brazil is urban, that more than a dozen of its cities have more than a million residents

Urban studies ideas

Urban studies are popular locations for fieldwork, since 70% of us live in built up areas

Stars in your lives

This activity has been designed to be a stimulating and fun way of practicing map skills using the free OS maps for schools

Road Race

This activity encourages students in Key Stage 3 to practice and develop their map skills using their free OS maps of the local area

High street regeneration: place-making and changing spaces - Dr Steve Millington, Manchester Metropolitan University

Declining retail poses fundamental questions to the future of places where we live, work and socialise. How can geographers envisage brighter futures for their creative, social, cultural and economic development?

Sustainable consumption and production

Should the global population reach 9.6 billion by 2050, the equivalent of almost three planets could be required to provide the natural resources needed to sustain current lifestyles