Everest – A Reconnaissance

An exhibition of the first platinum prints to be created from the original 1921 negatives housed at the Society – including photographs by George Mallory – and amongst the earliest images to document Everest, the people and places of the region.

The hazardous effects of tectonic plate movements - Pat Wilson

Pat Wilson speaks about how global hazards can be explained by understanding the recent movements of tectonic plates in places such as New Zealand and Hawaii. 

The fight for beauty - Dame Fiona Reynolds

Fiona reflects on why beauty matters, yet barely features in public debate and policy. She will argue that beauty is needed to moderate the increasingly commercial, economistic narrative that prevails today.

The Abyssinian difficulty: a Victorian expedition - John Pilkington

In 1868 the British government mounted an expedition to rescue European hostages. John looks at the changes in Eritrea and Ethiopia in the intervening 150 years.

 

Mountaineering challenges: climbing the world’s highest mountains - Vanessa O'Brien

Vanessa describes climbing the Seven Summits and contrasts climbing the Asian peaks of Everest, K2, Manaslu, Cho Oyu and Shishapangma.

From Greenland to high-mountain Asia – Arminel Lovell and Emily Hill

Arminel Lovell and Emily Hill from Newcastle University compare their research on glaciers in two contrasting cold environments, which are changing rapidly due to 21st century climate change and are expected to have major impacts on people, wildlife and infrastructure globally.

Spanish and Portuguese wine tasting

Join us for an evening of tutored wine tasting; sampling six wines from Spain and Portugal.

Economic Geography Futures

One-day conference organised by the Economic Geography Research Group, exploring the futures of UK economic geography.

GIS day in partnership with Esri UK

Join us for GIS Day 2018, in partnership with Esri UK. Open to A Level students and their teachers.

VR glaciers and glaciated landscapes

This free CPD event for A Level teachers will explore how the new, free-to-use VR glaciers and glaciated landscapes resource can be used in the classroom to support the new A Level specification.

A journey through Hungary

A country with a fascinating history; discover the richness of Hungary's culture, landscape and culinary palette. 

The Sustainable Development Goals: ambition or fantasy? - Linden Edgell

Linden considers whether the Sustainable Development Goals offer a realistic roadmap for the future of our planet.

Improved understanding of hazards from remote-sensing measurements - Dr Steven Palmer

Dr Steven Palmer will reveal how aircraft and drone-based remote sensing techniques can help us to better understanding hazards caused by coastal erosion along the Jurassic Coast.

Around Africa by public transport - Ian Packham

Ian Packham completed his first solo and unassisted circumnavigation of Africa by public transport – a 25,000 mile journey through 31 countries over 13 months.

Is the UK heading for a Green Brexit? Professor Richard Cowell

The Mark Blacksell memorial lecture will be given this term by Professor Richard Cowell from Cardiff University.
on "Is the UK heading for a Green Brexit: Leaving the EU and the future of environmental governance".  

Restoring Siberia’s Mammoth Steppes to stabilise a ‘carbon bomb’ – Nikita Zimov

A rare opportunity to meet Nikita Zimov and hear him talk about the science and practices of Arctic rewilding.

The Unknown City

The Unknown City
Friday 30 November to Tuesday 11 December
Usual exhibition times (10am-5pm Mon to Fri)

Exhibition exploring the invisibility of urban displacement across four cities, bringing together insights from the Migrants on the margins field research programme.

African Twilight: The Vanishing Rituals and Ceremonies of the African Continent - Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher

Award-winning photographers Carol Beckwith and Angela Fisher share the images and experiences behind the making of their new magnum opus, African Twilight.
 

Subject knowledge update: Changing places

Dr Simon Oakes will present a workshop for A Level teachers.

Christmas quiz

Come one and all to test your general and geographical knowledge at a festive quiz.

You are here: Geospatial technologies in the public domain - Dr Gary Priestnall

This talk will begin by summarising the capabilities and applications of GIS before considering the key technological developments that have allowed more widespread use of digital geographic information by the general public.

Off-site safety management

This two-day course, on 4 and 5 December, looks at the safety management issues involved in planning, managing and evaluating local visits, fieldtrips, residentials and exchanges.

Educational Visits Coordinator Training

A full day workshop that supports Educational Visits Coordinators (EVCs) in their roles by covering the legal and practical procedures required of their position.
 

Map and photo evening

A chance to share stories about travels, adventures and experiences in a series of 10-minute talks. Mulled wine and mince pies at interval.
 

Breaking new ground: Portsmouth Harbour and QE carriers - Captain Iain Greenlees

To prepare Portsmouth Harbour for the Queen Elizabeth carriers, new technologies were developed to dredge three million tons of sediment from the seabed. In excavating previously undisturbed sediments, the task revealed a fascinating range of geological and archaeological artefacts.

Educational Visits Coordinator Update Training

This course gives EVCs at all schools the opportunity to look into current material in more depth and share good practice with other EVCs.

Death of a translator - Ed Gorman

Former journalist Ed Gorman covered Afghanistan during the Russian invasion and Belfast during the 1980s. Image: Ed Gornan. 

Is the Paris climate agreement still viable?

A panel of experts discuss the progress made in tackling climate change since December 2015 and examine the many problems which lie ahead. 

Society open house afternoon

To celebrate the support provided by the Heritage Lottery Fund to enable our work, we are pleased to invite you to a celebratory Open House afternoon.

Children's lecture - Breaking the norm

Join TV presenter, adventurer, explorer and naturalist, Dwayne Fields, for the Society’s annual children’s lecture.

Spaces of Internationalism - Professor Mike Heffernan

At a moment when global cooperation is under threat, this lecture examines the history of internationalism, with particular reference to the international role of RGS-IBG.

A Level study day - Year 13

Our A Level study day gives Year 13 students the opportunity to improve their subject knowledge, receive useful examination technique guidance and learn more about 'thinking like a geographer'.

Prized possessions from amazing locations: Christmas social

Christmas social including four mini geographical talks and a three course meal.

Spaces of Internationalism

At a moment when global cooperation is under threat, this exhibition examines the history of internationalism, with particular reference to RGS-IBG’s international role.

The landscapes of Jane Austen - Dr Alan Crosby

Jane Austen lived at a time when fashions in landscape design were in the process of change. This talk considers landscape design in the late Georgian and Regency periods, in the context of those wonderful masterpieces of literature. 

 

Chile revisited – Sara Wheeler

Sara returns to the thin country to mark the 25th anniversary of her bestselling book recounting a six-month journey from the Peruvian border to Chilean Antarctica.

Sea level change and global warming – Professor Roland Gehrels

Professor Roland Gehrels, from the University of York, will speak on sea level change and global warming, asking which lessons from the past can inform the future.

Creating a 'master map' of the UK: a route to a better future? - Miranda Sharp

Miranda explores how powerful information about location can be used to build a system of smarter infrastructure to help the UK economy and society to thrive.

Human cognition – developments in navigation: Jeremy Morley and Professor Kate Jeffery

Recent neuroscience research has explored how the brain represents details of places and navigation - but how is that linked to how we navigate in the real world?

Lost Worlds - Andrew Hayden

A further selection of short films from Andrew's historic collection, including an 1932 expedition from Mexico to Borneo.

 

Chasing fire - Dr Thomas Smith

Through sharing his experiences of chasing wildfires accross four continents, Thomas will explore the science of 'pyrogeography' and what it can tell us about the drivers and impacts of environmental change. 

On View: Mapping the peace

David McNeill illustrates how maps reflected and were affected by the Versailles Peace Conference.

Building bridges from the Foyle to Ojague: Philip Donald

Philip will describe his experiences and the challenges involved in building the Foyle bridge and bridges for villages in West Africa.

Natural justice – Professor Lorna Dawson

This lecture explores the many ways that the natural environment can deliver to the criminal justice system. 

Southampton: gateway to the world - Andy Skinner

For well over 2,000 years, Southampton has played host to soldiers, travellers, merchants and emigrants. Join Andy from SeaCity Museum for a whistle-stop discovery of this remarkable history and the stories of people who called it home.

Exploring market-based fixes for climate change - Dr Peter Howson

Peter considers the ups and downs of market-based conservation as an alternative to oil palm in Indonesia.

A Level study day - Year 12

This study day gives Year 12 students the opportunity to improve their subject knowledge, receive useful examination technique guidance and learn more about 'thinking like a geographer'.

Iditarod trail: The last great race on Earth - Max Hall

The Iditarod Trail sled dog race is a legendary journey of epic proportions across the frozen wastelands of the Alaskan wilderness. It includes 1160 miles of snowy wilderness, crossing mountain ranges and sea ice. In this talk, Max Hall will show slides of the epic journey and discuss his unforgettable experiences on the trail. 

The immeasurable world: journeys in desert places – William Atkins

William recounts his experiences of some of the world's driest places, from the borderlands of the USA to the sacred deserts of Egypt's Desert Fathers, seeking to understand why the desert has exerted such a grip on human imagination.

A new Arctic in the making - Professor Klaus Dodds

In advance of his Monday night lecture in London Klaus discusses how and where the Arctic is changing and why it matters to those who call it home and those who don’t.

School member lecture: Carbon cycle

Professor Jeremy Pritchard from the University of Birmingham will discuss the Carbon cycle.

Endangered or vulnerable: lessons from snow leopard research: Ian Convery and Volker Deeke

Combining camera trap data and environmental modelling a team of University of Cumbria researchers set out to investigate the state of a snow leopard population in Kazakhstan's Ile Alatau mountains.

The last radioactive woodpecker - Charles Barder

Charles Barder will be speaking about motoring from the splendour of Goodwood to the steppes of Mongolia with no route, no backup... and one mid-life crisis. 

Of Darwin and dwarfs: sea levels, ice ages and evolution - Professor Adrian Lister

Join Professor Adrian Lister from the Natural History Museum for a talk on sea levels, ice ages and evolution.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls: Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Springwatch unwrapped - Gillian Burke

Gillian takes us behind-the-scenes on one of the nation's favourite wildlife shows, to discover Britain's natural spectacles, hidden gems, and surprising oases of hope.

Are we wearing out the planet?

Join us to discuss the environmental damage caused by the fashion industry and possible solutions.

The map tour – Hugh Thompson

Maps can be beautiful, iconic and influential. Hugh draws on the Society's unparalleled collection to show how they have lured travellers to places from the 1600s to the present day.
 

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Be Inspired: Crusoe's Island

Marking the 300th anniversary of Defoe's classic, Alexander Maitland sketches the life and adventures of the original Robinson Crusoe.

Geography and technology: field reconnaissance from your desktop - Dr Leanne Wake

An interactive demonstration of open source software to search remotely sensed imagery for suitable field sites to reduce time and expense in the field.

 

Focus on travel photography

Join our panel of experts as they share some of their favourite shots and explain how to get the best results form your camera.

 

Fur seals, whales, candles and soap - Brian Anderson

Stunning images show what a difference the last 50 years of international protection has had on species in the South Atlantic.

The age of geography - Nicholas Crane

On this beautiful orb, we have reached the point in our collective journey where geographical knowledge is the best guarantor of our future. Nicholas Crane makes the case for the great age of geography.
 

The rise (and fall) of studentification - Professor Tony Champion

This talk considers the colonisation of residential neighbourhoods by university students and some recent changes in student and developer behaviours which may help to curb the further expansion of studentified residential areas.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Impacts of 1.5ºC of warming on coastal and marine system - Dr Sally Brown

One of the lead authors of the IPCC October 2018 report chapter on ‘Impacts on Natural and Human Systems’, Sally will speak on the impacts of 1.5°C of warming on coastal and marine areas, particularly in the South of England.

Less is more: community conservation in the rainforest - Matthew Owen

With the majority of tropical deforestation taking place in small plots, rainforest protection depends on local communities. Matthew Owen will speak about Cool Earth, an organisation which has pioneered a light-touch model that puts local people in control. 

 

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

An uphill battle - Theresa Breuer and Hanifa Yousoufi

Hanifa and Theresa recount the events that led to the first female Afghan ascent of Mt Noshaq, Afghanistan's highest peak, overcoming multiple political, cultural and environmental challenges.
 

Be Inspired: The expeditions and legacy of Sir Frederick Lugard

Rory O'Grady tells the extraordinary story of Sir Frederick Lugard, the soldier, anti-slavery activist, adventurer and explorer who became the first Governor-General of Nigeria and a Governor of Hong Kong.

Cape Town to Norfolk in a 1959 Riley - Robert Chalmers

Robert recounts key aspects of travelling overland through sub-Saharan Africa, Turkey and Iran back to the UK.

Neanderthal landscapes of the channel river valley - Rebecca Scott

Rebecca Scott, from the British Museum, discusses the Neanderthal landscapes of the channel river valley.

The forgotten forests of Latin America - Professor Toby Pennington

Toby will describe the beautiful tropical dry forests and woody savannas of Latin America, the threats they face and what we can do to ensure they have a safe future.

Geographical journeys: microlectures

An evening packed with tales of adventure and discovery to entertain and inspire, hosted by Mary-Ann Ochota. 

Sail Britain: Learning on the seas, connecting with the ocean - Oliver Beardon

See the blue planet from an entirely new perspective: where scientists, sailors, artists and researchers meet on the seas of the UK's coastline.

River of life, river of death: the Ganges under threat - Victor Mallet

Victor tells the story of the sacred river and explains how the fate of the world's most important waterway has
lessons for all the great rivers of our planet.

Have camera, will travel - Sarah Canton

Join Sarah on her travels from South India to The Hebrides, a photographic journey spanning two decades of adventure.

International organisations: creators of our world - Dr Kirsten Haack

Kirsten will define international organisations and their various functions before considering how the UN has shaped our understanding of development and poverty, and how this has impacted on development policy.

A night of geopolitics - Professor Danny Dorling and Professor Klaus Dodds

Danny will be talking about inequality and what Brexit teaches us about the British, whilst Klaus will be asking "who owns the Arctic?"

The wake of the whale - Professor Russell Fielding

Russell will describe the cultural traditions in Faroese and Vincentian whaling and how they impact on current sustainability practices.

A new Arctic in the making – Professor Klaus Dodds

The Arctic is changing. But how and where is it changing, and why does it matter to those who call it home and those who don't?

Educational Visits Coordinator Training

A full day workshop that supports Educational Visits Coordinators (EVCs) in their roles by covering the legal and practical procedures required of their position.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Educational Visits Coordinator Update Training

This course gives EVCs at all schools the opportunity to look into current material in more depth and share good practice with other EVCs.

Who governs Britain? Lessons from the nuclear industry – Dr Stephen Haraldsen

As nationalisation versus privatisation arguments re-emerge, Stephen will explore the rescaling of nuclear industry governance to draw wider lessons for contemporary Britain.

Tenochtitlan: the capital of the Aztecs - Dr Elizabeth Baquedano

A visitor to downtown Mexico City might not realise that this was once a lake where, in 1325, the wandering Aztecs found their promised land. Systematic excavations of this site have been ongoing since 1978.

Divided: why we're living in an age of walls - Tim Marshall

Best-selling author of Prisoners Of Geography, Tim Marshall delves into our past and our present to reveal the fault lines that will shape our world for years to come.

Geography at university workshops

These events provide sixth form students the experience to bridge the gap between school and university and explore what studying geography at university level is like.