The discovery of Antarctica and Antarctica today - David Vaughan, Jane Rumble and Camilla Nichol

Marking 200 years since the discovery of land in Antarctica four speakers will consider Antarctica’s history and its unique status as a continent reserved for peace and science.

Digital geographies - Professor Mark Graham

Far from being a space de-tethered from the material world, the internet has a very real geography. Mark explores why digital geographies matter, and how we can build more equitable digital futures. 

The Crossing: a photographic meditation on the Atlantic Ocean - Marissa Roth

© Marissa Roth. Between 2015 - 2019, award winning photographer Marissa Roth made seven transatlantic crossings on the Queen Mary II, resulting in a poetic photographic study of what it means to cross an ocean. 

From city to sea: microplastics in UK rivers - Professor Jamie Woodward

Research on microplastics has largely focused on the oceans, but what is the contribution from our rivers? 

Expedition: voyages to undiscovered places - Steve Backshall

Steve recounts astonishing tales from a year of expeditions. From first ascents of Arctic peaks to first descents of Himalayan rivers - he talks of narrow escapes and lessons learned from his extraordinary year.

Where physical and digital worlds collide - Paul Clarke CBE

The age of the smart mobile machine is upon us. Paul will explore the intersection between artificial intelligence, robots and their environments, and implications for our country and our planet.

A planet of three billion- Dr Christopher Tucker

How many people can the Earth support? Christopher encourages us to think geographically about the Earth’s carrying capacity whilst considering the perils faced by our planet and our species, and how to survive them.

Wilding: the return of the British farm - Isabella Tree

Isabella tells the story of a daring rewilding experiment at Knepp Estate in West Sussex, showing how a wilder countryside can benefit farming, nature and us.

Life on the Mosquito Coast - Rozemin Keshvani and Guillaume Bonne

Join photographer Guillaume Bonn and curator Rozemin Keshvani as they discuss Bonn’s photo essay on forgotten colonialism “Mosquito Coast”.

Stop talking about migration and start discussing inequality - Professor Heaven Crawley

The Director of the world’s largest migration research project argues that inequality should be central to our thinking about migration and how inequality is an important analytical tool for understanding migration processes and outcomes.

A look at Singapore's longer history, c. 1300 - 1950 - Professor Peter Borschberg

Peter explores how the strategic location of Singapore has historically made it a contested space and what role the island and its settlements have played across the centuries.

The Polar Ocean Challenge - Sir David Hempleman-Adams

Having successfully crewed the first British sailing boat to sail around the North East/North West passages in one season, David gives us his personal account of this exciting journey and the consequences of this ventur

‘The lines, which are so very fine’ - Dr Katy Barrett

‘The lines, which are so very fine’: John Harrison, William Hogarth and the trouble with drawing a line of Longitude. Katy considers how a clockmaker and an engraver played their parts in how the longitude problem was solved on paper, in London, before it could ever be resolved at sea.

What fate for the ice sheets? - Dr Tasmin Edwards

Greenland and Antarctica are distant, unfamiliar places. We hear of giant icebergs breaking away, glaciers crumbling: but how much we do know about the fate of these great ice sheets?

Getting to net-zero: What can nature do? - Professor Gideon Henderson

The UK’s climate change targets commit the country to reach net-zero greenhouse gas emissions by 2050. Getting there will mean some big changes to agriculture and land-use. DEFRA’s Chief Scientific Adviser explains how this can be done.

Living with Wildlife - Dr Krithi Karanth

Krithi will explore the collapse and recovery of wildlife across India over the last two centuries, and share her insights into the development of conservation interventions in addressing human-wildlife conflicts.

The journey of the mask - Chris Rainer

Chris Rainier has spent thirty years exploring masks of the world. Chris will explain the meaning behind mask rituals and why humans have worn masks since the dawn of civilization.