Who wants to live forever?

This unit of work explores important demographic themes

Britain's ageing population

Britain is facing a dramatic shift in its population age structure, caused by both a declining fertility rate and a rising life expectancy rate

How and why the world’s population will stabilise at nine to 10 billion, and the concepts of ‘developed’ and ‘undeveloped’

Population growth, rising affluence, energy policy and climate change – these are the “four corners” of the food crisis.

Feeding the 9 billion

We will need 70% more food to be produced to cope with the massive expansion of urban living, the rise of the middle classes, climate change and resource scarcity

Internal migration

By 2050, it is projected that 70% of the world's population will live in cities. 5.2 billion urban residents are expected in Asia and Africa. How is internal migration shaping these cities? 

New India

The purpose of this module is to explore what is often referred to in the media as ‘New India'

Who wants to be a billionaire

The richest one per cent of adults in the world own 40% of the world's wealth, and about half the world's population live on less than US$2 a day

Discovering megacities

By 2050 it is expected that 70% of the world population will live in urban areas. Find out more about the areas these people will live in - megacities

2011 UK Census

Prompted by rapid population growth, the UK government ordered the first national census to take place in 1801. The UK census counts the total population and records its characteristics, such as age, gender, employment and health. A census has been carried out every 10 years since 1801, except during wartime in 1941

How are migration trends affecting UK population growth and how has the government responded?

Sampling techniques

Data is gathered on a small part of the whole parent population or sampling frame, and used to inform what the whole picture is like

Despite comprising over three quarters of Russia land mass, Siberia is home to only forty million people, one of the lowest population densities of any region or country in the world

As the size of the world’s population increases so too does the demand for land on which to house people, grow food and harvest resources which they increasingly demand

Sustainable consumption and production

Should the global population reach 9.6 billion by 2050, the equivalent of almost three planets could be required to provide the natural resources needed to sustain current lifestyles

 

 

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